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Most of us, these days, are touch typists. Tablet keyboards are decidedly not built for touch typists. Unless that software keyboard happens to be engineered by the team at Swype.

Finger Detection

The first and most basic idea is actually pretty simple: Dryft is designed to sense when your fingers are resting on the home row. We’ve all put our finger on a key, let it linger too long, and entered a dozen of the same letter. Dryft is designed, when you rest your fingers on the keyboard, to keep from inputting any data. So, if you’re resting your fingers on the home row, you can do that without worrying about afjkldsfkdsjla; all over your document.

A Keyboard That Moves The Keys

The first innovation is as stunning as it is simple. One of the problems with touch typing is that it’s impossible to use a home row on a tablet; there’s just no feedback or guide, so you have to look at your hands or rack up the mistakes as they drift off the home row. So, Dryft deals with this in a way that’s as logical as it is weird; once you’ve got your fingers resting on the home row, and start typing, Dryft essentially moves the keys around as you type so that your fingers are always resting on the home row when they return.

Essentially it learns your finger movements and typing style, and the keyboard dynamically adapts to fit. It’s both incredibly neat and kind of freaky.

Autocorrect, But Better

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Dryft claims, as a result of this, to both have better autocorrect, and to make autocorrect less and less necessary as it learns your typing style and just shoves the key you’re actually thinking about under your clumsy typing fingers. That’s a claim we’re a bit skeptical of, but either way, Dryft will hopefully get the funding it needs: They’re currently looking for investors.










Dan Seitz

 
Dan Seitz is an obsessive nerd living in New England. He lives in the Boston area with a fiancee, a dog, a cat, and far too many objects with processors.