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We’ve all been in a situation where all we really want is to shut out the outside world. Maybe we’re on an airplane and we want to keep the chatty person next to us from weighing in on what grinds their gears. Maybe we’re in a waiting room. Either way, if you want a little privacy, the Glyph will ensure you see and hear only what you want in a personal home theater.

Screens In Your Face, Headphones On Your Ears

Of course, the Glyph is far from the first attempt to put a home theater in our backpacks; this has been an offshoot of virtual reality technology for years. But the Glyph claims to have licked a major problem with these, which is screen resolution. Using a low-power LED, they reflect light off a micro-mirror array and directly onto your retina. As for how blasting your retinas with light directly feels, they claim it causes “very little eyestrain”, so take that as you will.

Headphones When You Need Them

For example, the Glyph is built just like a normal pair of closed-cup headphone, so if you want to just listen to music, you can flip them up and rock out. They also claim to have just a slim cable handling all of this information, jacked into an HDMI output or an audio jack, which certainly will help make them multifunctional.

Beta Blues

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There is, however, one rather large drawback you have to deal with if you decide to shell out your $500; that only gets you a beta product. The Avegant team is up front about the nature of the beta, but that still might give some pause. If you’re not one of them, though, you can fund the project through their Kickstarter; don’t worry about funding, as they’re already at nearly three times their goal.



Dan Seitz

 
Dan Seitz is an obsessive nerd living in New England. He lives in the Boston area with a fiancee, a dog, a cat, and far too many objects with processors.