When you buy a new high-performing TV, you may have to figure out what to do with the old one. You may want to donate your old TV since a number of places will take them. First, however, you have to know where to donate a TV, which is information that may be easier to obtain than you think.

KEY TAKEAWAYS:

  • Your TV donation may help reduce pollution and greenhouse gas emissions that would be released during the manufacturing of new TVs.
  • To find a list of places to donate a TV, you should check the EPA website or your county’s.
  • Make sure to remove all personal information and batteries from your electronics prior to pick up or delivery.

Reasons to Donate or Recycle Electronics

Many electronics have valuable resources and materials in their parts. For instance, while monitors and TVs have some differences, they are made from similar materials. These materials include metals, plastics, and glass. By donating your electronics, you may help reduce pollution and greenhouse gas emissions when manufacturing new materials. Additionally, some locations provide additional benefits for donating materials and appliances. Finally, you may receive a tax deduction for the year when you do your taxes by donating.

Finding Where to Donate TVs

Several websites include information on the donation and recycling of TVs. For example, the EPA website contains a list of places to recycle different electronics. According to this list, you can contact various TV manufacturers or retailers to recycle your TV, such as LG, Samsung, Sony, TCL, and Vizio.

For more local information, your county may have information on its website. In addition, the county has more specific information with places to donate TVs. However, some businesses may have size restrictions for TVs that can be donated. For example, Best Buy can only take cathode-ray tube (CRT) TVs smaller than 32 inches and flat-panel TVs smaller than 50 inches. It’s estimated that there have been over 20 million CRT TV sets being disposed of every year – and that number gets larger each year, as well. Especially since more and more people are purchasing Smart TVs because they offer so many features like cameras and microphones.

Businesses That Accept TV Donations

Some retailers may help you donate or recycle TVs. For example, Best Buy accepts donations of TVs of a certain size. Best Buy will likely recycle these TVs, salvaging the remaining materials. However, there may be an applied fee for picking up and hauling your old appliances. Additionally, consumers purchase a replacement product and have it delivered by Best Buy Home Delivery and Geek Squad.

Nonprofit organizations may also accept donations of TVs. Although some locations may receive different electronics and appliances, Habitat for Humanity offers stores in many neighborhoods that allow you to donate items for resale in your community. These stores are called Habitat ReStores, and the money raised helps families build an affordable place to live. They may even provide pickup for larger items.

Steps to Take Before Donating a TV

To prepare for the removal of your TV, you should make sure to remove all personal information, which would be more applicable to smart TVs than older tube TVs. However, if you do have a TV with WiFi capabilities, you should disconnect from your network and choose to forget it on the device. This option is typically available under the settings menu. If you cannot find the option that says “forget,” you should be able to remove the device from your network using a computer. Additionally, all batteries included in the remote or other accessories should be removed by you before pick up or delivery.

F.A.Q.S

Where can I donate a used TV?

Some charity or thrift shops may take TV donations. Additionally, certain retailers for TVs will also accept TVs to recycle.


Can someone help me move my heavy TV?

Some places will pick up your old TV for recycling or donation, though there may be an additional fee.


Why Can’t You Donate Your Old TV?

Many places will not accept an old CRT TV because it contains hazardous materials. Other sites may not take TVs because they are too large for safe storage or display.



STAT: And, it’s also estimated that there have been over 20 million of these TV sets being disposed of every year – and that number gets larger each year, as well. (source)

Christen Costa

Grew up back East, got sick of the cold and headed West. Since I was small I have been pushing buttons - both electronic and human. With an insatiable need for tech I thought "why not start a blog focusing on technology, and use my dislikes and likes to post on gadgets."

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