The most popular office chairs and most pieces of furniture come with manufacturer-based warranties that cover some common issues that could arise.

KEY TAKEAWAYS:

  • Office chair warranties vary when it comes to the length of coverage offered, and this also applies to the chair’s individual components.
  • Companies typically do not cover accidental damage, though they will cover damage accrued during shipping.
  • These manufacturer’s warranties are generally non-transferable.

Warranty Information for Office Chairs

Understanding every exclusion and point of coverage in a warranty plan can be frustrating. That’s why we are breaking down the common stress points for consumers when it comes to making the most out of your office chair’s warranty.

Insider Tip

Office chair warranties can vary wildly when it comes to how long it will offer coverage.

Office Chair Warranty Terms and Conditions Explained

Here are a number of factors to consider as you try to wrap your head around the warranty that came with the initial purchase of a brand new office chair.

Warranty Term Length

Office chair warranties can vary wildly when it comes to how long it will offer coverage. The manufacturer’s warranty length will also differ with each specific component of the chair and quality of office chair repair parts. For Heartier components, such as metal frames, could feature warranties as long as ten years. More fragile materials, such as cushions, could offer a year or two of coverage, although it is good to know how to replace your office chair cushion if need be. If a brand is offering a “limited lifetime warranty” that typically only refers to one or two components of the chair, likely metal frames, casters, or cylinders. Be sure to read the fine print before making a purchase.

Coverage Exclusions

Manufacturer warranties tend to not cover many common problems that could occur while owning an office chair. Companies will not cover accidental damage, such as stains caused by spills. They will, however, cover any damage that occurred to the item of furniture during transit. Many of these warranties do not cover the cost of labor, though they will pay for the replacement parts if necessary. Shipping costs tend to also not be included with a manufacturer’s warranty. In short, perform due diligence on what is and what is not covered before buying an office chair and understanding how long the office chair will last.

Modifications

Any modifications to an office chair beyond what is considered to be normal use will cause the warranty to become null and void. This applies to things such as exceeding the maximum weight limit, adding parts, removing parts, and even attempting self-repair. Be sure to contact the manufacturer before attempting any of the aforementioned procedures. Even a quick leather filler or leather paint when repairing your PU leather office chair can void your warranty.

Transferring the Warranty

Generally speaking, a manufacturer’s warranty cannot be transferred to another person. This means if you sell the office chair, the warranty will not carry over to the new owner. Some companies may offer an exception to this rule, but it is a rarity.

Warning

Generally speaking, a manufacturer’s warranty cannot be transferred to another person.

F.A.Q.

What can I do if I don’t know whether my product is covered under warranty?

Be would advise that you contact the product’s original manufacturer. Contact information should be provided somewhere in the instruction manual.


How do I purchase replacement parts for my office chair?

Some replacement parts can easily be purchased online, via Amazon, or a similar retailer. If you are having trouble locating the part, contact the manufacturer.


How long do office chair warranties last?

The warranty of an office chair can be entirely different for each individual component. Frames and casters, for instance, typically offer warranties that last for ten years or more. Fabric and cushions tend to offer warranties that only last for a few years at most.



STAT: Office equipment manufacturers paid out more than $6 billion dollars in claims in 2017. (source)

Lawrence Bonk

Lawrence Bonk is a copywriter with a decade of experience in the tech space, with columns appearing in Engadget, Huffington Post and CBS, among others. He has a cat named Cinnamon.

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