How to Remove Cat Scratches from Your Office Chair

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Updated September 1, 2022

Your cat can be your office chair’s worst enemy, scratching it with reckless abandon and leaving large claw marks or slight discoloration. This peculiar behavior is done to scent-mark turf, shed claws, or wreak havoc out of pure boredom. Luckily, there is a way to salvage a scratched chair that involves a leather repair kit, which will have your best office chair looking good as new!

KEY TAKEAWAYS:

  • Removing cat scratches from your office chair is easy and should take no more than 20 minutes.
  • To remove cat scratches from your office chair, you will need a leather repair kit, cleaner, and a small pair of scissors.
  • There are many ways to prevent cars from scratching your furniture, including cat-scratch sprays, furniture shields, double-sided tape, or pheromone diffusers.

Removing Cat Scratches from Your Office Chair

Here are steps you can take to remove cat scratches from your office chair.

STEP 1 Prepare the Area

Use a leather cleaner to thoroughly wipe the affected area, removing any loose debris, grime, and lint. From there, trim loose fibers with a small pair of scissors, concentrating on the large fibers. Be careful with the scissors so as to not puncture other areas. You do not have to disassemble the chair unless you want to fix the office chair base too.

STEP 2 Apply Leather Binder

Apply the leather binder by dabbing a small amount to a sponge or microfiber cloth before rubbing the affected area. This binder works to stabilize your leather’s surface and strengthen its structure, especially with heavy wearing and cracking. Be sure to apply anywhere from eight to 10 coats, waiting for 10 minutes between each coat before applying the next coat.

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STEP 3Sand the Area

Sand the area using 1200-grit sandpaper. This helps create a smoother and more even surface. It is worth noting that this method works wonders too if you are looking for how to fix cracked leather on an office chair.

STEP 4 Apply Heavy Filler

Use a small palette knife to apply a thin layer of heavy filler over the affected area, leaving it to dry for no more than 30 minutes. Feel free to apply additional coats (if necessary) until the scratch is level with the rest of the surface.

STEP 5Sand the Area a Second Time

Repeat Step 3 and use an alcohol cleaner to remove any debris from the leather’s surface.

STEP 6 Apply and Spray on Colorant

Using a sponge, apply the first coat of colorant, spreading it very thinly across the surface. After the first coat dries, feel free to add more filler and sand down before re-applying the colorant as needed. Be sure the alcohol from Step 5 has completely dried before doing this.

STEP 7 Add Finish

The last step is to seal the color onto the leather by applying the finish. Use a sponge and add no more than four layers. Be sure to allow each coat to dry before adding the next coat.

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F.A.Q.S

How can I protect my office chair from my cat?

One of the best ways to cat-proof your desk chair is to use cat scratch spray. Cat scratch spray works as a repellent while being completely safe for humans. It is usually made from natural ingredients. Note that different cat scratch sprays vary wildly in terms of effectiveness, so you may have to experiment with a few to achieve the best results.


Do cat scratch sprays work?

It depends on the regimen. Cat scratch sprays are designed to be sprayed frequently to build up effectiveness. Some require spraying every 24 hours to truly work.


How do I get my cat to stop scratching my office chair?

There are many ways to prevent a cat from scratching an office chair, including cat-scratch sprays, furniture shields, double-sided tape, or pheromone diffusers.



STAT: The average cost of a cat scratching post is within the range of $21.49 and $110.99. When there are multiple scratching angles, carpeted base play area, perch, and even bell toys for the cat to play with, you can expect to spend up to $150 – $200 on this cat type of cat scratching post. (source)

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