broken dvd

Serious question: When was the last time you used an optical disc? A DVD? A CD? Not that we’re knocking the technology, because it’s still a highly efficient method of storing and accessing information, and it uses lasers. Lasers are cool. It’s just the demand for optical discs seems to be declining, not rising, and yet, Sony and Panasonic are still turning out a new optical disc format.

Well, “new” is possibly a strong word. It’s really more of a RAID system except with Blu-Ray discs. The idea is that you put twelve 25GB capacity discs into one cartridge, and then use that cartridge for whatever purpose you feel necessary; so far the farthest they’ll go in terms of use is “professional use” and archives. It’s a bit odd in that their own press release admits that Panasonic has developed a system with more storage, and that Sony has developed a system that can handle files a bit better, but we guess there’s a market somewhere for a solution provided that it’s cheap enough.

And it is true that more and more information is arriving on more and more formats, and not all of it can be stored on a Blu-Ray. Historians in particular are concerned that we’re losing precious historical context every time a blog entry gets deleted or a YouTube video pulled. And for now it seems that this won’t be something they try to force on the consumer market in a bid to get you to stop watching Netflix, which is a rare switch from these two.

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That said, though… is this really all that necessary? We’ve got cloud storage, massive server racks, hard drives out the wazoo, and who knows what else. But we guess someone wants it, even if it is fairly pointless.



Dan Seitz

 
Dan Seitz is an obsessive nerd living in New England. He lives in the Boston area with a fiancee, a dog, a cat, and far too many objects with processors.