The “Right to Repair” in Nebraska will give farmers, independent repair technicians, and Nebraska ranchers access to diagnostic equipment, information, and genuine parts. These parts will help them in repairing their farm machinery and equipment. Senator Tom Brandt of Plymouth is the one who introduced LB 543. The bill’s discussion stems from the ongoing farmers’ concerns about the unwillingness of manufacturers of farm equipment to share the technology and information of the equipment. Generally, farmers want to have the ability to buy the right tools and use the correct information to repair their equipment independently.

KEY TAKEAWAYS:

  • Senator Tom Brandt of Plymouth introduced the Right to Repair” bill in Nebraska.
  • Issues with software in farming equipment are preventing independent repair shops from fixing them.
  • Dealerships manufacturers and farming industry representatives are against the right-to-repair bill.

Why Farmers Are Pushing for the “Right to Repair” Bill

The backbone of production agriculture is equipment and machinery. Tractors have to run to feed the cattle and combine harvesters in good condition when harvesting crops. The farming business is heavily reliant on working equipment. So, timely repairs are essential to farmers. This bill is similar to the right to repair act in Minnesota that also covers farmers.

Insider Tip

The “Right to Repair” in Nebraska will give farmers, independent repair technicians, and Nebraska ranchers access to diagnostic equipment, information, and genuine parts.

The Nebraska Farm Bureau has been engaging with farm equipment manufacturers at the state and national levels concerning the “right to repair” issue ongoing in the farming industry. According to McHargue, the Nebraska Farm Bureau is open to continuing discussions to help both sides develop a suitable private agreement.

The Nebraska Farm Bureau understands the symbiotic nature of how equipment manufacturers, together with their local dealers, work with rural communities and local businesses. Since they are essential partners, farmers would like more flexibility in repairing their equipment than independent car repair shops benefit from the bill. On the other hand, the right to repair bill in Washington mainly benefits tech consumers.

Generally, the right to repair law in Nebraska will work to ensure that farmers and ranchers can purchase what they require at a reasonable price. This effort will make it easier for farmers to run their equipment and repair them at an affordable rate by contacting an independent repair shop. Farm Bureau is not looking for the modification of farm systems. It is not the broader context of the right to repair. There has to be a common understanding between the manufacturers on what should be open for access and what can be agreed to limit access only to manufacturers. 

Insider Tip

The backbone of production agriculture is equipment and machinery.

F.A.Q.S

Can you repair a John Deere tractor?

In a company statement by a John Deere representative, the company said that it supports the right for customers to maintain, diagnose and fix their equipment safely. However, once the product/equipment is off the shelves, the owner can do as they please when maintaining and repairing it.


How do you go about maintaining your tractor?

Let us look at five maintenance tips to keep in mind:

  • Remove any fuel in the tank that has been there throughout the winter season and then add new fuel. 
  • Once the new fuel is inside, go and inspect the battery.
  • Check the condition of the tires.
  • Sharpen the attachments of the blade.
  • Check if there are any cracks on the belts.

How much fuel can you put in a tractor to use on an acre?

4.5 to 5 gallons per acre, including an auger tractor, trucking to town, and gas for the yard mower and the loader tractor.



STAT: Currently, 35 states are debating the R2R legislation that demonstrates the need for farmers to learn how to repair their equipment. (source)

Christen Costa

Grew up back East, got sick of the cold and headed West. Since I was small I have been pushing buttons - both electronic and human. With an insatiable need for tech I thought "why not start a blog focusing on technology, and use my dislikes and likes to post on gadgets."

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