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Livestream is a fairly popular platform for, well, live, streaming video. In addition to the spread of its hardware, it’s a popular platform for everything from red carpets and sports to lectures and theater performances. And now, it’s coming to Roku.

First of all, you won’t have to sacrifice any quality to see the streams on your TV: Livestream has stated that the app will stream HD for any content that’s available in high quality. Secondly, anything that’s publicly available on Livestream will be available to Roku users; just bust out the search function and you’ll be able to dig it out.

That’s a bigger deal than you might at first think. Livestream is the preferred platform for major content producers, and as a net result of that, is often the first place to go if you want to find archival video or other content. True, red carpet interviews from five years ago may not be the most compelling viewing to most people, but it’s nice to know you can have a crack at them if you want.

Furthermore, it also gives Livestream users a distinct advantage at getting their content out to people. You can get Livestream equipment for as little as $500, and consider for a minute that means that you could be putting content on millions of televisions for extremely low amounts of money. That’s important for newsgathering organizations, activists, performers, and lots of others looking to get their message out there and make what they want to say accessible to everyone.

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So, how much will this cost you? Nothing, actually. The app itself is totally free. Some content costs may come into play depending on who you want to stream from, but you won’t need to lift a finger for the app itself. Now, Livestream, let’s get onto consoles, eh?










Dan Seitz

 
Dan Seitz is an obsessive nerd living in New England. He lives in the Boston area with a fiancee, a dog, a cat, and far too many objects with processors.