Key Takeaways:

  • A monitor’s aspect ratio refers to how wide the picture is in relation to the overall height.
  • The most commonly used aspect ratio in modern displays is 16:9.
  • Some consumers have begun to adopt ultrawide monitors, which feature a 21:9 aspect ratio.

Finding the right computer monitor for your needs can be slightly difficult, as consumers must take the size and overall resolution into consideration. Another thing to keep in mind is the play’s aspect ratio.

Definition of Aspect Ratio on Computer Monitors

Aspect ratio is a term that originates from the cinema. It was coined to indicate how wide the picture was in relation to the overall height. Movies were originally in 4:3 aspect ratio and this ratio carried over into televisions and early computer monitors. This ratio eventually came to be known as 16:9 and is still commonly used in a wide variety of computing displays.

Related Posts:

Learn About Screen Sizing

Though a 16:9 aspect ratio is relatively common, modern displays have grown to accept a wide number of different ratios, each with its own advantages and disadvantages.

16:9 Aspect Ratio

As previously stated, many standard computer monitors arrive with a 16:9 aspect ratio. As such, it has become the standard aspect ratio for high definition displays. The first HD televisions, with pixel counts of 720p or 1080p, all adopted a 16:9 aspect ratio and computer monitors followed suit. Monitors with a 16:9 aspect ratio are excellent for simple computing tasks, including accessing search engines, playing simple web-based games, and sending emails. This size is also good for streaming video content that was not filmed with a wide screen in mind.

Tip: Monitors with a 16:9 aspect ratio are excellent for simple computing tasks, including accessing search engines, playing simple web-based games, and sending emails

Warning: This size is also good for streaming video content that was not filmed with a wide screen in mind

16:10 Aspect Ratio

The modern standard 16:9 aspect ratio has only been common since 2010. Before that, many computer monitors adopted a 16:10 aspect ratio. Throughout the early days of computing, from the 1980s until the 2000s, 16:10 was the go-to aspect ratio for computer displays. The 16:10 aspect ratio is a direct outgrowth of the original 4:3 aspect ratio. The 16:10 aspect ratio has fallen out of favor and it is nearly impossible to find modern monitors with this ratio.

Tip: Throughout the early days of computing, from the 1980s until the 2000s, 16:10 was the go-to aspect ratio for computer displays

Warning: The 16:10 aspect ratio has fallen out of favor and it is nearly impossible to find modern monitors with this ratio

21:9 Aspect Ratio

The 21:9 aspect ratio is a relatively new one and was initially adopted so televisions and monitors could mimic the movie theater experience, allowing users to replicate movie-watching in a widescreen format. If you are purchasing an ultra-widescreen HD monitor, it is extremely likely it will arrive in a 21:9 aspect ratio. This ratio is also great for modern video games.

STAT:

4K is undergoing a much faster adoption rate than that of 1440p, with a 50%+ US market share expected by the end of the decade.

Sources:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Computer_monitor

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Computer_display_standard

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aspect_ratio_(image)

*https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=E-dUveGINTg

https://picture.iczhiku.com/resource/paper/sykSkLkiziTTdMbm.pdf

Definition of Aspect Ratio on Computer Monitors FAQ

What are pixels?

Pixels are known as picture elements. They are known to the smallest physical points on a display. Pixels and resolution are directly correlated.

So the higher the pixel density the better right?

Yes and no. Generally speaking, high pixel density is a good thing but there will be diminishing returns as the number of pixels increase.

Can you see high-resolution videos on lower resolution screens?

Yes. You will be able to see high-resolution content on a lower resolution display, but you will not be able to view any of the added benefits that the higher resolution provides.

Lawrence Bonk

Lawrence Bonk is a copywriter with a decade of experience in the tech space, with columns appearing in Engadget, Huffington Post and CBS, among others. He has a cat named Cinnamon.

Related Articles

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *