Computer monitors occasionally fail, that is just a fact of life. Once a display is no longer functioning, it is time to get rid of and recycle the screen. We have assembled some helpful tips on how to easily recycle your computer monitor and related components before purchasing a new, high-quality monitor.

How to Recycle Computer Monitors

Computer monitors should not be simply thrown away in the trash, as more than half of the states in America will not accept them into landfills. They must be recycled.

Tips for Proper Monitor Disposal

When it comes to recycling a computer monitor, there are definitely some practices to embrace and others to avoid.

Check Your Local Big Box Retailer

Your first step is to check your local big-box retailers, such as Best Buy or Staples. These stores sell all kinds of computer monitors and most of them have some sort of recycling program in place. Staples has been recycling monitors for consumers since 2007 and Best Buy has been doing it since 2008. Be aware, however, that there may be a fee involved.

Tip: Your first step is to check your local big-box retailers, such as Best Buy or Staples

Warning: Be aware, however, that there may be a fee involved

Avoid Curbside Recycling Programs

It is highly unlikely that your area’s curbside recycling program will accept computer monitors, even if they accept materials such as scrap metal. This is because computer displays are made from a number of different materials and they are incredibly hard to break down into their individual components. If your area does offer bulky waste recycling, it is possible they can accept computer monitors. We recommend calling ahead to make sure.

Warning: It is highly unlikely that your area’s curbside recycling program will accept computer monitors, even if they accept materials such as scrap metal

Tip: If your area does offer bulky waste recycling, it is possible they can accept computer monitors

Take-back Recycling Programs

Many monitor manufacturers now offer what is known as “take-back” recycling programs. Simply put, this program allows you to mail the monitor back to its original manufacturer, allowing them to take care of the recycling process. Be sure to search the manufacturer’s website for pertinent details about this program. As a warning, not all of these manufacturers will pay for shipping when it comes to mailing the monitor to their recycling center.

Warning: As a warning, not all of these manufacturers will pay for shipping when it comes to mailing the monitor to their recycling center

Dedicated Electronic Waste Recyclers

There are for-profit and nonprofit organizations that deal exclusively in recycling electronic waste, including computer monitors. This is an ideal situation if you are looking to recycle computer monitors and desktop computers at the same time, or if you have multiple monitors to recycle at the same time. There may be a fee involved if the recycling company is for-profit, but nonprofits should be able to do it for free.

Tip: This is an ideal situation if you are looking to recycle computer monitors and desktop computers at the same time, or if you have multiple monitors to recycle at the same time

Warning: There may be a fee involved if the recycling company is for-profit, but nonprofits should be able to do it for free

STAT:

The EPA estimates that in 2013: 3.1 million tons of consumer electronic products were ready for end-of-life management, and 40.4 percent of these tons were collected for recycling.

A United Nations study reported that 44.7 million tons of e-waste were discarded in 2016, and only 20 percent of it was disposed of properly.

Sources:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Computer_monitor

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Recycling

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Computer_recycling

https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S0925527311003203

*https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zweHhVUdjjw

How to Recycle Computer Monitors FAQ

Lawrence Bonk

Lawrence Bonk is a copywriter with a decade of experience in the tech space, with columns appearing in Engadget, Huffington Post and CBS, among others. He has a cat named Cinnamon.

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