Investing in a high quality gaming chair is very crucial and consumers prefer when a newly purchased chair lasts for a long time. However, your pet cat or dog may have other ideas when it comes to the overall lifespan of your gaming chair.

KEY TAKEAWAYS:

  • Cats, dogs, and other pets can ruin a gaming chair in a number of ways, including with scratches or by urinating on the seat.
  • To prevent a cat from scratching your gaming chair, we recommend purchasing a dedicated scratching post.
  • You can also use a chemical spray to deter your pets from approaching your new gaming chair.

A Useful Guide for Pet Owners

It is true. Cats love to snuggle on gaming chairs, shedding fur everywhere. They also like to scratch up any exposed fabrics, causing long-term damage. On rare occasions, cats and dogs can even urinate or defecate on a gaming chair. How can you prevent these accidents from happening? That’s where we come in. Read this guide to know how you can connect to your bluetooth features in your gaming chair.

Insider Tip

To prevent a cat from becoming a scratching menace, we recommend investing in a scratching post or a related accessory.

How to Keep Your Gaming Chair Safe From Pets

Here is some useful advice and some generalized tips that you can use to protect your gaming chair from accidents related to one of your pets.

Give a Cat Something Else to Scratch

Cats scratch out of instinct and as a way to stretch and relax. You want your pet cat scratching regularly but you do not want it scratching your brand new gaming chair. To prevent a cat from becoming a scratching menace, we recommend investing in a scratching post or a related accessory. There are all types of scratching posts and accessories out there. As a warning, your cat may not take to the first post you purchase, but keep trying and the cat is sure to like one eventually.

Insider Tip

You can dissuade your pets from deciding your gaming chair is a good place to mark their territory, however, by using a deterrent spray.

Spray Your Furniture with a Deterrent

Cats and dogs alike will begin spending time on a gaming chair as a way to mark their territory, which is a perfectly natural instinct for many animals. You can dissuade your pets from deciding your gaming chair is a good place to mark their territory, however, by using a deterrent spray. There are many types of sprays out there and a significant number of them have proven especially effective when it comes to scratch and urine reduction. Before you spray your gaming chair, be sure to perform a spot test first. A spot test will determine if your chair can handle the chemical agents included in the spray. If all else fails, use a mixture of lemon juice and water to spray on the chair. As you groom your cat to ensure that your chair is protected from scratching, you can also customize your gaming chair to fit your specific needs.

Trim the Claws of Your Pet

If scratching is a problem, it may be time to trim your pet’s claws. This can easily be done with a simple pair of nail or claw trimmers. Be sure to avoid cutting the claws down too much, as you could injure your pet. Most veterinarians will also perform this procedure for a fee.

Warning

Before you spray your gaming chair, be sure to perform a spot test first. A spot test will determine if your chair can handle the chemical agents included in the spray.

F.A.Q.

Do all cats scratch furniture?

All cats scratch, as it helps them remove dead layers of their claws, but not every feline will scratch furniture. Some will scratch posts, walls, bushes, and other minimally invasive items.


How can clicker training help to save your gaming chair?

An option of last resort for cat owners is clicker training. This type of training uses positive reinforcement to teach your cat to do things, such as avoid the gaming chair in the bedroom.


Should I declaw my cat?

We would recommend against permanently declawing a cat. The procedure is expensive and can actually injure the cat. Trim its claws instead periodically.



STAT: There was a total of approximately 95.6 million cats living in households in the United States in 2017. (source)

Lawrence Bonk

Lawrence Bonk is a copywriter with a decade of experience in the tech space, with columns appearing in Engadget, Huffington Post and CBS, among others. He has a cat named Cinnamon.

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