There are plenty of phone insurance service providers out there, each of them offering a unique set of plans. In other words, it can be tough to decide which smartphone insurance plan to choose or how to find the best cell phone insurance.

KEY TAKEAWAYS:

  • There are a multitude of insurance providers out there and even more individual plans.
  • These carriers tend to offer coverage for phones that have been lost or stolen, issuing a replacement device for a fee.
  • High-quality smartphone insurance plans also cover accidental damage and feature low deductibles.

How to Choose Cell Phone Insurance

While the service providers and individual plans do differ, there are some features to look out for when you are choosing an insurance plan for a smartphone or a related device. For example, how to activate a replacement phone (here is how to activate your At&t insurance replacement phone), and things of that nature.

Understand Protection Plan Options

Before you can make an informed decision on what plan to purchase, you need to understand the benefits that can be available to you. A specific plan may or may not offer the below features, so make a list of must-have benefits.

Insider Tip

One of the primary benefits of purchasing smartphone insurance is that they tend to cover loss and theft.

Coverage for Theft and Loss

One of the primary benefits of purchasing smartphone insurance is that they tend to cover loss and theft. If you are someone who tends to lose their phone while out and about, this can be a must-have feature. Activating a phone replacement does typically accrue a fee, however, that goes beyond what you have been paying for the insurance itself. This fee can range from $49 to $249, depending on the plan and the make and model of your phone. Even if this fee is on the higher end, say $249, that is still much less expensive than purchasing a brand new iPhone. Additionally, make sure you know how to activate your insurance replacement phone.

Low Deductibles for Repair

Some insurance plans feature extremely low deductibles, meaning you’ll only have to pay $20 to $30 out of pocket before the insurance benefits kick in. Some plans eliminate deductibles entirely when it comes to relatively simple repair procedures, such as replacing a cracked screen or a dead battery. Deductibles will fluctuate depending on your insurance provider, your plan, and the make and model of your phone. As a warning, the plans with the lowest deductibles tend to feature the highest monthly plan cost, with the reverse also typically being true.

Accidental Damage Coverage

Another key reason why consumers choose phone insurance over an extended warranty is that they tend to cover accidental damage. This includes damage related to accidental drops onto the pavement or even in water. Be sure to read the fine print here, as some plans merely offer coverage for damage pertaining to manufacturing errors and do not offer coverage for accidental damage.

Insider Tip

Some plans eliminate deductibles entirely when it comes to relatively simple repair procedures, such as replacing a cracked screen or a dead battery

F.A.Q.S

Do I really need phone insurance?

You certainly do not need phone insurance, per se, but modern smartphones are extremely expensive. An insurance plan can help mitigate the financial risk of breaking or losing a phone.


How much does phone insurance cost?

Plans differ wildly when it comes to price, but most plans come in at around $9 to $20 each month. Before choosing a plan, you should also factor in yearly deductibles and associated fees.


How to claim phone insurance?

To file a phone insurance claim, you will have to contact your insurance provider. This can normally be done online or on the phone.



STAT: Over 60% of smartphone owners have experienced phone damage, according to Allstate. (source)

Ryan Mcbride

Ryan McBride is a writer based in Los Angeles. He has contributed work to magazines and sites including Gayot, Spy, Paper, Ladygunn, 3AM and the Crab Creek Review. He writes consumer reviews, essays, science and tech journalism as well as literary and art criticism.

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