Printers wear down and die over time. It is just an unfortunate fact of life. You will probably have to renew your printer after a while, even if you have a top-rated printer. Consumers may wonder, however, what to do with these old printers once they give up the ghost.

KEY TAKEAWAYS:

  • Old printers should be recycled or donated to a local charity.
  • These printers can be brought to a local recycling center or a big-box retail location, such as Staples.
  • Charitable locations may be able to send over a drive to pick up an old printer, though it should be functional.

Recycling Old Printers

Generally speaking, old printers should be recycled, as they are manufactured using a wide variety of materials and components, many of which cannot easily be broken down.

Insider Tip

The easiest way to recycle an old printer is to simply throw it in the trunk of your car and drive it to one of these recycling centers.

A Helpful Guide on How and Where to Recycle Old Printers

Looking to donate your old inkjet printer? You may want to find out what type of ink is used in inkjet printers as this may be valuable information to the person you are donating to. Here are some more tips and guidelines to help you easily and efficiently recycle any old printers you have laying around the house.

Local Recycling Centers

Your town or municipality likely features a local recycling center or two. The easiest way to recycle an old printer is to simply throw it in the trunk of your car and drive it to one of these recycling centers. It is important that you do not throw the printer in your recycling bin, as most areas do not accept large items of electronics in such bins. If you think your area does accept gadgets in a home-based recycling bin, look it up and go for it. As a warning, it is possible that a local recycling center will charge a small fee for taking the printer off your hands.

Insider Tip

Staples, for instance, will accept an old printer and recycle it for free, even if you did not originally buy the printer from Staples.

Big-box Retailers

Many of the best-known big-box retail stores will accept old printers and related gadgets. Staples, for instance, will accept an old printer and recycle it for free, even if you did not originally buy the printer from Staples. Best Buy, Office Depot, and other stores have instituted similar programs, but there may be a fee involved. Also, you will have to drive there and drop the printer off, so a ride will have to be arranged.

Donate it to Charity

There are multiple organizations out there that allow the donation of old printers. These printers will then be sent to people who need them, such as special-needs children or low-income families. As an added bonus, these charities will often send someone to come and pick up the printer, which can save you a lot of time. The charitable organizations also have needs like printing a5 pamphlets so they are likely to take your old printer. Not sure what size is a5 print? You can simply find out what type of printer you have.

It is important to consider that these charitable organizations will only accept old printers if they are functional, so be sure to power them up and give them a whirl before donating.

Warning

As a warning, it is possible that a local recycling center will charge a small fee for taking the printer off your hands.

F.A.Q.

Are all HP printing products recyclable?

Not every printer product manufactured by industry giant HP is recyclable. We recommend taking a look at your instructions and documentation.


Should you sell your printer?

You can always sell an old printer on Craigslist, Facebook Marketplace, or eBay. However, the printer should be in good working condition before the sale.


What is “remanufacturing”?

Remanufacturing typically refers to a printer or related item of electronics that has been professionally refurbished by the manufacturer.



STAT: According to National Geographic, only 9% of plastics are actually being recycled. (source)

Lawrence Bonk

Lawrence Bonk is a copywriter with a decade of experience in the tech space, with columns appearing in Engadget, Huffington Post and CBS, among others. He has a cat named Cinnamon.

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