Many modern printers can effectively handle making copious amounts of photocopies, effectively removing the need to head to a copy shop.

KEY TAKEAWAYS:

  • Some printers can handle making photocopies, such as multifunction and all-in-one printers.
  • To begin the process, access the photocopy interface of your individual printer and enable it.
  • Place the document on the platen, set the number of copies, and press start.

What Printers Can Make Photocopies?

Only printers with a dedicated photocopy function can handle making photocopies. In most cases, you will want to choose a multifunction or all-in-one printer, otherwise known as an MFP. However, some traditional printers can handle simple photocopy jobs. To make photocopying even simpler for you, you can make any printer wireless, as shown in this guide.

Insider Tip

Check your printer’s instructions for any mention of a photocopier feature.

An Easy to Follow Guide on Using Your Printer to Create Photocopies

Each printer features a unique interface and process to go about making photocopies. We have, though, assembled some universal tips and guidelines to follow to get you up and running. It is also easy to print a poster-sized image using a regular printer from home.

Check Your Printer’s Specs

Before you go about making photocopies with a printer you will want to make sure that the printer itself is up to the task. Check your printer’s instructions for any mention of a photocopier feature. If you have lost the instruction manual, we recommend making a quick Google search. To restate, multifunction and all-in-one printers typically have a photocopying function, whereas traditional laser and inkjet printers do not. This is not a universal rule, however, as some standard printers can make photocopies.

Insider Tip

If you are having difficulty accessing the photocopy feature of your printer, check out some YouTube tutorials or Google your specific make and model.

Follow the Photocopy Process

Multi-function printers will usually, though not always, include a dedicated interface for making photocopies. Find this interface and power it on, navigating your specific menu to allow for making photocopies. Again, there are thousands of printers out there and the specific instructions will differ from model to model. **If you are having difficulty accessing the photocopy feature of your printer, check out some YouTube tutorials or Google your specific make and model. **

Make the Copies

Now it is time to actually make some photocopies. The process will vary depending on your actual printer, but it will normally start by placing the document you need to be copied on the printer’s platen. The platen is a flat glass surface that allows for scans, faxes, and photocopies. Once that has been achieved, head into your photocopy interface and set the number of copies you wish to make. Close the lid of your printer and push start. In a few moments, your copies should be ready to go.

If Your Printer Cannot Make Photocopies

If your printer cannot handle photocopies, you can always simply set the printer to make a multitude of duplicate copies of a particular document. This will achieve a similar result.

Warning

Multifunction and all-in-one printers typically have a photocopying function, whereas traditional laser and inkjet printers do not.

F.A.Q.

How do I copy a document or photo using my product’s control panel?

This process will differ depending on your printer, so just read the instruction manual. You can always menu dive until you find a photocopy interface.


How do you photocopy something?

Generally speaking, a document is photocopied by placing it on the platen, closing the lid, and then pushing start. The actual process is similar to when you scan a document.


What is a printer?

A printer is a device that is used to make physical copies on paper of digital documents. Printers can use ink, toner dust, or other methods of reproduction.



STAT: The trade-off is that older Bluetooth products, that use Version 1.1 or 1.2, have a rated range of 10 meters (about 33 feet), which is shorter than your router or Wi-Fi-enabled notebook’s range. (Bluetooth 2.0 and 2.1, however, have a rated range of 100 meters.) The longer the range, of course, the more options you have when it comes time to find homes for your printer and laptop. (source)

Lawrence Bonk

Lawrence Bonk is a copywriter with a decade of experience in the tech space, with columns appearing in Engadget, Huffington Post and CBS, among others. He has a cat named Cinnamon.

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