Office chair mats are a great way to prevent your favorite office chair from sliding around a hardwood floor as you work. These mats come in all different shapes, sizes, and design types to fit the needs of most consumers. Some consumers, however, may find it difficult to locate a mat that meets their exact size specifications.

KEY TAKEAWAYS:

  • Office chair floor mats may need to be trimmed to fit a particular work area.
  • Use a high-quality pair of crafting scissors or tin snips to complete this procedure.
  • You can also use a traditional utility knife, but it may take several cuts before you complete the trimming process.

Vinyl Mats Explained

Generally speaking, office chair mats are made from vinyl or a vinyl carbonate material such as PVC. Mats made from a vinyl derivative can typically be cut to size, but be leary of mats made from glass or plastic derivatives, as these may be too sturdy to cut. Trimming office chair mats is not as complicated as say, fixing a loose office chair arm. You can do it all by yourself.

Insider Tip

When it comes to purchasing scissors for this task, make sure to choose a heavy-duty pair that is intended for crafting or industrial purposes.

How to Trim Office Chair Mats

A well trimmed chair mat impacts the ease of movement in your office. However, if you have a problem with squeaky noises in your chair then you should know how to take out gas lift from the office chair. Here are some general guidelines to help you trim an office chair mat made from vinyl or a vinyl derivative.

Scissors

Some vinyl mats can be easily trimmed using scissors and a ruler to ensure straight cuts. When it comes to purchasing scissors for this task, make sure to choose a heavy-duty pair that is intended for crafting or industrial purposes. You can use a market ahead of time to plan out your cuts to ensure an attractive end result. Avoid standard kitchen scissors, as these will typically not be sharp enough to cut into vinyl or PVC.

Insider Tip

Use the utility knife to slowly cut into the mat along a predetermined path.

Tin Snips

Tin snips, otherwise known as snippers, can make short work out of vinyl office chair mats. These snips are designed for heavy-duty cutting jobs and are relatively inexpensive. Tin snips can easily cut through thin metal, vinyl, PVC, acrylic, and many of the other common materials that make up office chair floor mats. The long blades of a snip make it easy to cut straight and leave a smooth edge, but be sure to wear protective gloves during use.

Utility Knife Blades

Another option for trimming office chair mats is to use a standard utility knife. You may not be able to use a utility knife, such as an X-acto knife, to quickly score and break off unwanted mat portions. Instead, go for a slow and steady approach. Use the utility knife to slowly cut into the mat along a predetermined path. Repeat this process several times, digging deeper into the mat on each occasion. Eventually, you will cut through the mat entirely. This method is guaranteed to work, but it may take longer than using a high-grade pair of scissors or tin snip.

Warning

Mats made from a vinyl derivative can typically be cut to size, but be leary of mats made from glass or plastic derivatives, as these may be too sturdy to cut.

F.A.Q.

What are chair mats made of?

Chair mats are made from a variety of materials, including vinyl, polycarbonate materials, PVC, glass, and more.


What is the difference between a chair mat for carpet and hard floors?

Generally, a chair mat intended for use on carpeting comes with small studs that carefully grip the carpet during use. Mats intended for use on hard floors feature a smooth backing. Keep in mind your flooring when deciding what to put under your office chair.


Why do some chair mats have a lip?

Certain chair mat designs feature a lip that is intended to be placed underneath the work desk to help protect the flooring when a chair is placed underneath the desk.



STAT: While some vinyl products do have a scratch-resistant surface, no vinyl flooring is 100% scratch-proof. (source)

Lawrence Bonk

Lawrence Bonk is a copywriter with a decade of experience in the tech space, with columns appearing in Engadget, Huffington Post and CBS, among others. He has a cat named Cinnamon.

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