As you go about cleaning and maintaining your top-rated laser printer for the first time, you may be wondering exactly where to find the waste toner cartridge.

KEY TAKEAWAYS:

  • A laser printer’s waste toner cartridge, otherwise known as a waste toner bottle, is a container that collects toner waste that has accumulated during use.
  • These waste bottles can be attached to the toner cartridges themselves or affixed somewhere inside of the printer.
  • Advise caution when emptying a toner waste bottle, as toner particles can be damaging to a person’s health.

What is a Waste Toner Cartridge?

The waste toner cartridge, otherwise known as a waste toner bottle, is a repository that catches any excess toner dust as you complete print jobs. This helps to keep the interior components of the laser printer functioning properly, even as you complete numerous printing tasks like on the most common A4 photo paper in a highly trafficked office environment.

Insider Tip

The waste toner cartridge, otherwise known as a waste toner bottle, is a repository that catches any excess toner dust as you complete print jobs.

Finding the Waste Toner Cartridge

The process of finding the waste toner cartridge or waste toner bottle will differ depending on the actual design of your laser printer. We have assembled some useful tips, however, to help you locate the waste toner bottle as quickly as possible.

Cartridge-based Waste Toner Bottles

The vast majority of modern toner cartridges have the waste toner bottle included inside of the cartridge itself. The good news here is that every time you replace a toner cartridge, you are also throwing out any waste that has accumulated during use. The disadvantage to this design choice is that these cartridges are extremely difficult to crack open to remove the toner waste without destroying the cartridge itself. This could be an issue if you want to remove any excess toner waste before the toner cartridge has been fully depleted.

Insider Tip

The good news here is that every time you replace a toner cartridge, you are also throwing out any waste that has accumulated during use.

Printer-based Waste Toner Bottles

Some modern laser printers feature an actual waste toner bottle that remains unaffiliated with the toner cartridge. This means you can find this waste bottle using the printer’s instruction manual, remove it, empty it, and easily replace it. This process will differ depending on your printer model, but it should only take a few moments to complete. We do advise extreme caution, however, as toner dust can be dangerous when breathed in. We recommend wearing safety gear, such as gloves and a mask that will resist toner dust.

Tips to Find the Waste Toner Bottle

If you are struggling to find the waste toner bottle, you can always hit up the instruction manual or the manufacturer’s website. There are also numerous YouTube tutorials for nearly every laser printer out there. There are also numerous how-to guides throughout the Internet that have been purposefully written for a variety of laser printer models. With a little time and effort, you will be able to locate the waste bottle. Also, if you use an inkjet printer, the printhead makes all the printing possible by spraying ink on the paper to create text and images.

F.A.Q.

How do I replace the waste toner container?

The process will depend on the design of your printer and where the waste toner container is located. We recommend that you read your printer’s instruction manual for more details.


What does a laser printer use to print?

Laser printers do not use ink, separating them from inkjet printers. Laser printers do use toner dust, which is contained inside of a toner cartridge.


What about waste toner bottles that are inside of toner cartridges?

If your toner waste bottle is inside of the toner cartridge itself, you will automatically dispose of the contents when you replace the toner cartridge.



STAT: In the year to the end of June 2019, Hewlett Packard (HP)’s share of global printer shipments stood at 26.6 percent, with Canon taking a 20.2 percent share of the market. (source)

Lawrence Bonk

Lawrence Bonk is a copywriter with a decade of experience in the tech space, with columns appearing in Engadget, Huffington Post and CBS, among others. He has a cat named Cinnamon.

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