Let’s face it, a pixelating TV can be pretty annoying and have a significant effect on your TV watching experience. Pixelating is a TV display anomaly that morphs the picture on your screen into rapidly moving small blocks.

KEY TAKEAWAYS:

  • Any TV that uses pixels to produce images on the screen is vulnerable to pixelation issues.
  • TV pixelating, snowing, tiling, or ghosting are all forms of display picture degradation often caused by a weak signal.
  • Sometimes, pixelating will have nothing to do with your TV unit or cables at your home. At times, the problem is at the source.

It’s essential to note that any TV that uses pixels to produce images on the screen is vulnerable to pixelation issues. These display issues apply to both Plasma and LCD technology even if you have a top-rated TV.

TV owners will also experience pixelation if they have older TV sets, substandard equipment, and outside interferences or issues at the source, resulting in TV pixelating.

What is TV Pixelating?

TV pixelating, snowing, tiling, or ghosting are all forms of display picture degradation often caused by a weak signal. The pixelation squares that form on the screen represent packets of data that have not been received due to a weak signal. It will occur when the incoming TV signal is incomplete or weak.

Consequently, your TV will process the picture incorrectly since it doesn’t have all the data needed to process the image.

What causes TV Pixelating?

Nearby appliances, weather, and competing signals are all potential causes of TV pixelating. However, the following are other common causes of pixelation.

Warning

Television owners with low-end plasma or LCD TVs are more likely to experience pixelating thanks to the unit’s refresh rate.

Outdated TV

Television owners with low-end plasma or LCD TVs are more likely to experience pixelating thanks to the unit’s refresh rate. Older TVs ideally have a refresh rate of 60Hz, meaning, it displays 60 frames per second. However, over time, older TV units will lose their ability to process images at this rate, leading to pixelating. You can always upgrade your TV even to a 60 inch TV just find out what the dimensions of a 60 inch tv are and if it will be a good fit in your house.

Faulty Connection Cables

Cable TV companies connect homes using cables that are laid out from the company to the client. The most common cables are the RG-6 and RG-59. Over time, these cables will begin to wear out due to several reasons and may affect your backlight. You can check what backlight on TV means and how you can solve this issue.

Eventually, these effects will start to damage the signal leading to various problems, including pixelating.

Issues at the Source

Sometimes, pixelating will have nothing to do with your TV unit or cables at your home. At times, the problem is at the source. For example, during programming, your broadcaster might intentionally hide an image by pixelating due to censorship reasons. Pixelating might also be unintentional and caused at a transmission level and not necessarily by the user’s TV.

Insider Tip

Pixelating might also be unintentional and caused at a transmission level and not necessarily by the user’s TV.

External interference

Nearby appliances, weather, and competing signals may cause pixelating. Current generated by lightning also has an effect on cable TV signals and results in pixelating. Nearby electrical appliances might produce over-the-air signals that can interfere with TV signals causing pixelating.

How to Fix and Prevent TV Pixelating

The most common cause of pixelating is cable issues. Therefore, ensure all cables leading to your TV are secured firmly. Also, check that your cable signal has sufficient strength. Contact your provider for this information.

Check your antennae, and if possible, install an external roof-top antenna to increase the TV signal strength.

If you have more than one TV in your household, it is essential to note that there is only enough TV signal to go around. TV owners will experience weak signals if they have multiple splitters in their households. Coaxial cable splitters weaken the signal strength by half. If you are looking to have various connections in your house, have your provider identify and solve these issues.

Insider Tip

If you have more than one TV in your household, it is essential to note that there is only enough TV signal to go around. TV owners will experience weak signals if they have multiple splitters in their households. Coaxial cable splitters weaken the signal strength by half.

F.A.Q.

What is TV pixelating?

TV pixelating, snowing, tiling, or ghosting are all forms of display picture degradation often caused by a weak signal. The pixelation squares that form on the screen represent packets of data that have not been received due to a weak signal.


What causes TV Pixelating?

Weak signals commonly cause pixelating. The pixelation squares that form on the screen represent packets of data that have not been received due to a weak signal. Consequently, the TV will process the picture incorrectly since it doesn’t have all the data needed to process the image.


Why are outdated TVs more prone to pixelating?

Older TVs ideally have a refresh rate of 60Hz, meaning, it displays 60 frames per second. However, over time, older TV units will lose their ability to process images at this rate, leading to pixelating.


How do TV cables cause pixelating?

Cable TV companies connect homes using cables that are laid out from the company to the client. Over time, these cables will begin to wear out due to several reasons. These effects will start to damage the signal leading to various problems, including pixelating.


STAT: More people are streaming TV services through the internet. The current cable TV market share in the U.S is just under 50%. However, according to surveys, the streaming market will be worth over $70 billion by 2021 (source)

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