If you’re looking for the best projector, you probably want to know how many watts does a projector use. Knowing the watts per hour and the approximate consumption cost of running a projector per day is a significant first step in shopping for modern projectors. Power consumption over time using a projector largely relies on the technology within the unit. So, read on to learn about each type of projector and their watts per hour usage.

KEY TAKEAWAYS:

  • Power consumption rates depend on the projection technology used by the projector.
  • A battery-powered projector will use the least kWh rate on average and the lowest energy consumption rate.
  • Your utility company measures your daily consumption rate per kilowatt-hour.

How Many Watts Does My Projector Use?

Your projector’s power usage depends on its breed of projection technology. For example, a battery-powered projector will use fewer watts per hour than a commercial theater. We should note that your electric company likely measures your monthly electricity consumption in Kilowatt-hours (KWh).

Insider Tip

Laser projectors have the highest electricity usage of any projector type.

Learn how to replace a projector bulb if you want to fix or adjust your projector’s brightness levels.

Battery-Operated Projector

Battery-powered projectors use the least amount of watts of any projector type. You can plug battery-operated projectors into a wall outlet, but most people use it portably. The battery capacity on most brands lasts between 2-5 hours, using an average of 10-70 Watts every hour.

DLP Projector

DLP projection technology is the oldest version available, but they remain relevant to their high brightness levels. The normal power consumption of a DLP projector is 150-350 Watts per hour.

LED Projector

Your LED projector should use about 30-150 watts per hour. LED has a power requirement but produces a brilliant range of colors. Your device power consumption in kWh is what counts, as your utility company uses that rate to bill you. Compared to other types, an LED projector

Considering these factors, you may want to replace your projector bulb with an LED.

Laser Projector

Laser projectors are not a common consumer electronic, but their market share is growing by the year. This imaging tech uses lasers to light and creates a brilliant image, which comes with a high cost. Laser projectors use anywhere from 150-800 Watts per hour, giving them the highest average consumption rate in kWh of any projector.

Warning

Your projector’s watt rating is based upon an hour of operation.

F.A.Q.S

Does a projector use more power than a TV?

Most HDTVs use fewer watts per hour than a projector, but TVs use more KWh per month. Projector consumption is less overall because televisions are typically used for more hours per day. Either way, you shouldn’t see an increase in your electricity company charges.


Are Projectors energy efficient?

Overall, projectors are energy efficient, and they get more efficient depending on the model projector you use. As a rule of thumb, the most energy-efficient projectors have more lumens per watt than other models. For the most energy-efficient models, check the list on the Energy Star website.


Can you play Netflix through a projector?

Your projector can play Netflix and other streaming platforms without issue. In addition, smart projectors with wireless capabilities and communication features make it easier than ever to watch streaming movies and TV with your unit.


How many years does a projector last?

The average projector has an expected lifetime of 1500 to 2000 hours. That said, modern high-end projectors last between 5000 to 20000 hours. Usually, you’ll notice your projector going bad due to your brightness levels decreasing.


STAT: The share of Americans who say they watch television via cable or satellite has plunged from 76% in 2015 to 56% this year. (source)

Coby McKinley

Coby writes out of Louisville, Kentucky, and he is a graduate of Indiana University. He founded GameControllerReviews in 2019 and is a regular contributor to FightFreaks as a pre-fight analyst.

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