Modern electric scooters have captured a large segment of the personal transportation market in recent years, though the industry does have its detractors. In other words, there are a lot of haters.

KEY TAKEAWAYS:

  • Electric scooters have caught on in recent years, but they are not without their detractors.
  • Some folks dislike e-scooters because of the sheer level of ride-sharing services that have popped up all over the country.
  • Additionally, some younger riders tend to be daredevils, which can be an annoyance for pedestrians.

Why the Hate on Electric Scooters?

Though increasing in popularity, electric scooters are often met with scorn by a relatively large segment of the population. As a matter of fact, Portland residents recently threw more than 50 electric scooters into a river.

Insider Tip

Ride-sharing companies, such as Lime, have been sprouting up all over the country.

What Do People Think?

There are several reasons why electric scooters are disliked by some consumers. Here are just a few of the reasons.

Ride-Sharing Concerns

Much of the antipathy directed toward the electric scooter industry is aimed at one subcategory of the market. Ride-sharing companies, such as Lime, have been sprouting up all over the country. These companies tend to attract tourists and long-time residents of a city find hundreds of tourists zipping up and down the streets to be an annoyance. Ride-share customers have a bad habit of leaving the scooters all over the place and they can often get in the way of locals. Additionally, some residents do not like those companies such as Bird use free public space to sell rides with their electric scooters. As an owner or user, it is helpful to learn where to park your e-scooter.

Insider Tip

Electric scooters have caught on in a big way with the country’s kids, including teens, preteens, and other age groups.

Hazardous Riders

Electric scooters have caught on in a big way with the country’s kids, including teens, preteens, and other age groups. Youth carries with it a certain level of recklessness, which can translate into hazardous scooter riding practices. Young riders can be found riding recklessly on sidewalks and other areas that local municipalities have outlawed scooters. Some heavily trafficked pedestrian walkways have become flooded with young electric scooter riders, thus making walking somewhat of a frustration. Additionally, many of these young riders are illegally using electric scooters, as they are not even old enough to ride one in some cities. Finally, we recommend e-scooter suspensions on your vehicle because they provide stability and less risk of losing control.

Safety Concerns

Many parents and concerned citizens have become worried that riding an electric scooter can cause bodily harm. While there is some risk involved with riding an e-scooter, as they are moving vehicles, this risk is minimal when compared to cars and other modes of transportation. Much of this risk can be mitigated simply by wearing protective gear, such as a helmet knee pads, and arm pads. Most scooter riders who get in an accident are not wearing a helmet.

Warning

Young riders can be found riding recklessly on sidewalks and other areas that local municipalities have outlawed scooters.

F.A.Q.

How much do electric scooter ride-sharing services cost?

Generally speaking, scooter-sharing companies charge around $1 to start a ride and then between about $0.15 and $0.40 per minute during use.


Is it illegal to use an electric scooter?

It is not illegal in most cities throughout the country, though there are some age restrictions. For instance, you must be 12 years old to ride an electric scooter in Minnesota and 15 in California.


Are e-scooters illegal in the UK?

It is legal to purchase and ride an electric scooter in the UK, but they have been banned in many public spaces. Check your local regulatory agency for updated information as to where you can ride a scooter.



STAT: Regarding scooter-related head injuries, 95 percent involved riders who were not wearing helmets; and most were the result of riders being forced into the street, owing to a lack of proper bike lanes and a prohibition against riding on the sidewalk. (source)

Lawrence Bonk

Lawrence Bonk is a copywriter with a decade of experience in the tech space, with columns appearing in Engadget, Huffington Post and CBS, among others. He has a cat named Cinnamon.

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