There is no deliberate reason why your top-performing air purifier puts out cold air. It is not a part of its design. This reason will still not stop you from wondering, “why does my air purifier blow cold air”? There are indeed occasions where this air appliance seems to blow out cool air. Note that this is based on an incidental reason and is far from being an intentional one.

KEY TAKEAWAYS:

  • Air cleaner fans cannot generate enough air to make a room cold.
  • Airflow direction is a significant contributing factor that creates a sensation of lower temperature in a room.
  • The mechanism of air purifiers alone does not allow it to produce cool air.
  • Air purifiers can reduce indoor air pollutants by up to 99.97 percent.

Why Do Air Purifiers Blow Cold Air?

These air-cleaning devices do not exactly generate cold air. Nothing in its product description would indicate that it can do so. It is not an air conditioner. Despite this, there are still some who wonder how to get cool air from an air purifier.

which air purifier to use when you are pregnant

Keep in mind, these purifiers are not perfect for everyone so you should know which air purifier to use when you are pregnant, for example. There are air purifiers that you can use when pregnant, as long as they do not use ionic air filters or ozone generators. These two release harmful substances that can affect the health of the mother and the unborn baby.

Finding the Possible Causes

The Fan

It is easy to assume that cold air comes from its fan. However, it would help if you kept in mind that this is not as strong as a desk fan. The latter can send a more powerful air stream through a room, while an air purifier can only help move air through its air filters. It cannot create a cooling sensation to even make it on par with an electric fan in summer. An air purifier only improves air quality by encouraging air movement, which is perhaps why cold air occurs.

Airflow Direction

Another possible contributing factor is where the air current is moving. For example, an air cleaner positioned in the middle of a room is likely to boost its air circulation. The purpose is not how to get cool air from an air purifier but rather where to place it for the best airflow direction. This placement helps make it easier to trap particulate matter through its air filters. That is its primary purpose, and any cool air produced from it will likely be coincidental.

Air purifiers can eliminate contaminants in a room by up to 99.97 percent. Its correct placement is essential to maximize its use.

A Cool Room

On the other hand, air conditioners can get a room cold and may even lead to dry air conditions. It has an evaporator coil and a condenser coil that helps create such an atmosphere. These components in air purifiers are not present. Neither can be considered an air purifier feature though an already cold room due to previous air conditioner use could cause cool air to pass through it. Air cleaners cannot lower a room’s temperature regardless of its fan setting.

If you want to save on your electricity bill, consider why you should buy energy efficient air purifiers. These are air purifiers that have been certified by the agency called ENERGY STAR and can draw up to 40 percent less energy during use.

F.A.Q.S

Do I need to have an air purifier even if I already have an air conditioner in the same room?

Yes, they perform separate functions though you only need to purchase either appliance depending on your actual needs. For example, get an air cleaner to improve the indoor air quality of your home or office. An air conditioner, on the other hand, should be explicitly purchased to cool it down.


How cold does an air purifier get?

It does not get cold. The appliance only helps circulate air but does not change its temperature.


Does an air purifier make a room warm?

No, it does not. The reasons are the same as to why an air cleaner might seem to make a room cold.



STAT: An air purifier typically consists of at least 1 to 3 filters, and the more filters it has, the less direct air flow you can feel. (source)

Lawrence Bonk

Lawrence Bonk is a copywriter with a decade of experience in the tech space, with columns appearing in Engadget, Huffington Post and CBS, among others. He has a cat named Cinnamon.

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