One of the key benefits of owning and riding a top-tier electric scooter is being able to quickly and efficiently run neighborhood errands. Consumers may be wondering, though, where to park their newly bought scooters when they run these errands.

KEY TAKEAWAYS:

  • Each city and state has different laws regarding the parking of electric scooters, though you can usually use a traditional sparking spot.
  • Brush up on local rules and regulations by visiting a governmental agency or by sending out an email.
  • Avoid parking a scooter on grass, on sidewalks, or anywhere else that might frustrate pedestrians and average citizens.

Where to Park an Electric Scooter

When it comes to parking an e-scooter, each city, municipality, and state will have different rules and regulations, though it is typically allowed to use a standard parking space or a bike rack. There are also some common-sense practices to consider.

Insider Tip

Avoid being a nuisance by being conscious as you go about leaving a scooter unattended between uses.

Parking Tips and Laws

We have assembled a list of common-sense tips and guidelines that should keep you out of trouble while attempting to park an electric scooter between rides.

Don’t Be a Nuisance

Some cities have completely banned electric scooters, as users of ride-sharing apps like Lime began leaving unattended scooters all over the place. This led to frustration and some minor accidents. This is why there tends to be hate on electric scooters sometimes. Avoid being a nuisance by being conscious as you go about leaving a scooter unattended between uses. Scooters should not be parked at crosswalks or bus stops, nor should they just be left on the grass or sidewalk for anyone to stumble over. If you think leaving the scooter somewhere maybe a bad idea, it usually is.

Insider Tip

You would do well to research your area’s laws and act accordingly.

Research Local Rules and Regulations

As previously mentioned, each city and state can have different rules and regulations regarding the parking of electric scooters. You would do well to research your area’s laws and act accordingly. This can be done in person at a local governmental agency or online via a web portal. Additionally, many cities and municipalities have active Twitter accounts that accept direct messages for situations just like these. Once you get the scoop on local regulations, you will feel much more comfortable as you ride and park. And if you come back and it doesn’t start, you better know where the fuse on your e-scooter is located.

Fold and Carry a Scooter

You may not even have to park your scooter. Most modern electric scooters are relatively light, around 15 to 30 pounds. Additionally, a great number of new scooters feature foldable designs that have been purpose-built for easy carrying. In other words, you can just take the e-scooter in with you as you conduct errands or perform a day’s work at the office. You may have to attach handles, a carry strap, or store the scooter in a dedicated case. When considering carrying a scooter, you should also factor in any pertinent safety gear.

Warning

Scooters should not be parked at crosswalks or bus stops, nor should they just be left on the grass or sidewalk for anyone to stumble over.

F.A.Q.

Do e-scooters follow different rules than bicycles?

This depends on where you live. In some states, such as Maryland, e-scooters and bicycles feature extremely similar rules and regulations. In other states, they can differ quite significantly.


Why can’t e-scooters ride on sidewalks?

Some states disallow the use of electric scooters on sidewalks. This is done to protect walking pedestrians and scooter riders. Check with your local government for more information.


Where can e-scooters park?

Electric scooters can typically park in a standard parking space or be laid on a bike rack. It is important to note that each state and city will likely have completely different rules regarding parking an e-scooter.



STAT: The average e-scooter journey covers only 1.9 kilometers or just over one mile. (source)

Lawrence Bonk

Lawrence Bonk is a copywriter with a decade of experience in the tech space, with columns appearing in Engadget, Huffington Post and CBS, among others. He has a cat named Cinnamon.

Related Articles

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *