Apart from knowing what a digital camera is and what kind of files a digital camera creates, Learning about what to do if your camera gets wet is always worthwhile. Those interested in underwater photography might not benefit as much, but most people don’t have fully waterproof cameras. Whether you’re a hobbyist or professional, this is all the information you need.

KEY TAKEAWAYS:

  • You can use many materials for drying your camera thoroughly, and you should always keep a few of them on hand for emergencies.
  • Water damage will void most warranties, so make sure you check over all of your paperwork thoroughly.
  • The rice method is typical for drying out wet electronics and is one of the best ways to ensure that your best digital camera recovers fully.

What To Do if Your Digital Camera Gets Wet

Understanding what to do if your digital camera gets wet can save a lot of heartaches. Since most warranties are voided by water damage, it’s crucial to act fast. Whether it’s salt water, fresh water, or something in between, all water can lead to serious damage to your camera if left untreated. For instance, the memory may get damaged, and you may not be able to recover your photos. As such, it is important to know what to do when your digital camera gives you memory card errors due to water damage or any other issue.

Insider Tip

As soon as your camera comes into contact with water, turn it off.

What To Do Immediately

You need to act as quickly as possible to prevent permanent damage. Cheaper cameras are especially susceptible to water exposure, so quick action is crucial if you have a lower-end model.

Turn Your Camera Off Immediately

As soon as your camera comes into contact with water, turn it off. Accidental damage from water can turn disastrous for two reasons. The first is that the water can cause a short in the actual device, and the second is that rust can form. Turning your camera off takes care of the first reason.

Insider Tip

One of the most potent parts of your protective arsenal is a large bag of uncooked rice.

Disassemble Your Camera

Removing rust from water damage is essentially impossible. Taking your camera apart is the first step in preventing rust from forming in the first place. Make sure to detach your lens, empty the battery compartment, and take out any memory cards.

Properly Dry Affected Parts

Making sure that every part is taken care of in the drying process will be crucial. There are a few things you should always keep in your all-weather camera bag so you can be ready for the worst. Here are a few different options:

  • Paper Towel
  • Microfiber Cloths
  • Dry Towel
  • Absorbent Cloth

The Rice Method

One of the most potent parts of your protective arsenal is a large bag of uncooked rice. Most people know that wet electronics should be disassembled and placed into white rice to suck their moisture. This extends to cameras, as well. Make sure to put the camera in the rice for at least a few days in a warm, dry place to ensure this common drying method works.

Warning

Cheaper cameras are especially susceptible to water exposure, so quick action is crucial if you have a lower-end model.

F.A.Q.

Does a warranty cover a water-damaged camera?

Unfortunately, water exposure can void your warranty entirely. Clarification can always be found in the paperwork issued with your warranty, however.


Why is sensor dust a problem?

Sensor dust can cause a ton of issues by causing image manipulation. If there’s is a significant amount of sensor dust, your images will not turn out correctly. The sensor cleaning process isn’t a difficult one. Make sure you clean off sensor dust regularly.


How do you check if your sensor is dirty?

To check for sensor dust, simply take a photo. If you see specks of black on your picture, then you know that it’s time to start the sensor cleaning process. Dust particles can wreak havoc on your digital camera, so clean off sensor dust regularly.


Are self-cleaning sensors sufficient?

This style of lens is excellent for self-maintaining between regular cleanings. However, a self-cleaning sensor will still need you to clean out dust particles and other debris that might get into your camera.


STAT: There’s a chance about 70 percent that you’ll be able to completely dry the device and put it back to work within hours. (source)

Christen Costa

Grew up back East, got sick of the cold and headed West. Since I was small I have been pushing buttons - both electronic and human. With an insatiable need for tech I thought "why not start a blog focusing on technology, and use my dislikes and likes to post on gadgets."

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