If you are shopping around for a top rated digital camera, you may be wondering how much storage space you will need on your computer to save all of your images. What is the average file size of a picture taken by a digital camera? Keep reading to find out.

KEY TAKEAWAYS:

  • The average file size of a picture taken by a digital camera will vary depending on a number of factors.
  • The file type will impact the size. JPG files tend to be on the smaller side, while raw files, such as PDFs and BMPs, tend to be on the large side.
  • Image resolution also plays a role in the size of the image files. Generally speaking, the higher the resolution, the larger the file.

What is the Average File Size of a Picture Taken by a Digital Camera?

Short answer, there is no average file size when it comes to digital images as it depends on a number of factors, including the file type, image resolution, dots per inch, and even the subject matter. All in all, the clarity of the images produced is all that matters the most. This is why you need to know what an aperture is, and how it works in order to have a better control of the level of brightness in your images.

Insider Tip

There is no average file size when it comes to digital images as it depends on a number of factors, including the file type, image resolution, dots per inch, and even the subject matter.

What Determines the Image Size?

Image content size is determined by a number of factors, some of which will be detailed below. And if you want to produce oversize images, learn more about a full frame digital camera and all the benefits it offers.

File Type

When it comes to your phone’s built-in digital camera or a standalone model, the type of image file will play a large role in determining the overall file size. Generally speaking, JPG files are the smallest image file type, though they also offer the lowest resolution. Raw files take up the most space. Raw image types include PDFs and the like. Though they are excessively large, they are generally preferred from an image resolution standpoint, as this makes them easier to both view and edit by digital professionals. High-end cameras may also use proprietary file types that are on the larger side.

Insider Tip

Some cameras have larger sensors, which translates to more dots per inch (DPI) or pixels per inch (PPI).

Image Resolution

The resolution of the image itself will factor into its overall file size. Some cameras have larger sensors, which translates to more dots per inch (DPI) or pixels per inch (PPI). Again, raw images tend to boast the highest resolutions, so they will take up plenty of room on memory cards or on the storage available via cell phone cameras. You can adjust the image resolution via the settings menu of your camera. Check the instruction manual for detailed steps on how to do this.

Compression

How images are compressed will impact their overall size. Check the compression algorithm via the camera’s instruction manual and choose lossless compression to preserve the integrity of the file, while also helping to keep the size down a bit. If you choose to go with the raw option when it comes to the file type, it will likely take up a lot of room no matter what compression algorithm you are using.

Warning

JPG files are the smallest image file type, though they also offer the lowest resolution.

F.A.Q.

How to optimize images for better web design?

This will depend on your website and what you are going for. You want to find the right balance of fidelity and file size, so images can load quickly when users visit the site.


How do you find the file size, image size, and resolution of your image?

You can find the file size and image size on your computer quite easily. If you’re on a PC, right-click on the image file, choose “Properties” and then the “Summary” tab. On a Mac, Ctrl+click on the image file and choose “Get Info.”


What is the ideal image size for a website?

There is no optimum digital image size for a website, but smaller is typically better, so long as it still looks good.



STAT: According to research from KeyPoint Intelligence/InfoTrends, an estimated 400 billion digital photos were taken globally in 2011 and this eventually rises to 1.2 trillion photos in 2017. (source)

Lawrence Bonk

Lawrence Bonk is a copywriter with a decade of experience in the tech space, with columns appearing in Engadget, Huffington Post and CBS, among others. He has a cat named Cinnamon.

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