The Ferryboat Gets Your Car Across Any Body Of Water | Gadget Review
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The Ferryboat Gets Your Car Across Any Body Of Water

There are many places the most rugged cars can go. Across mountains. Through muddy fields. Into the darkest of forests. Of course, there is one place they generally can’t go, and that’s in the water. Which can put something of a crimp in your offroad adventure, especially if you’re hoping to get somewhere and you can’t find a ferry… or if your “off-road adventure” is more like “trying to deliver valuable equipment in a flood.” Fortunately, you can now just bring your own, in the form of the Ferryboat. That is a bigger commitment than the Riot Kayaks Edge LV – Best Overall Kayak.

Ferryman

This particular boat is pretty simple in the construction. It’s a double-walled inflatable made of Hypalon, which you’ll know from pretty much anything inflatable that’s more durable than a pool floatie. But this is way more durable than your average water wing. Check out these specifications: 26.25 feet in length, a 10.5 foot beam and weighs 660 pounds, making it relatively easy to throw in the back of the more rugged off-roaders. And with a maximum load capacity of 11,000 lb and a displacement of over 22,000 lb, you can use it to get pretty much any vehicle across pretty much any body of water, especially since it’s got a surprisingly shallow draft of just two inches per ton of weight, so it’s pretty much ideal for shallow water. It even comes with aluminum ramps

Ferried

The Hovercraft Ferryboat

The Hovercraft Ferryboat has a shallow draft, making it ideal for exploration.

Of course, you’ll need to bring your own propulsion system. You’ll also need to bring your own inflation system, as there’s only so much the makers, Hovercraft, can do. But with a base price of roughly $7,000, your choice of materials and how many layers it comes with, and a wide range of accessories you can add to the final product, this is ideal both for people who want to get as far away as possible, and who want to deal with water-based disasters more efficiently.

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