9.2
Expert Rating

The Lenovo Yoga C630 Chromebook is a premium 2-in-1 aimed at a niche sector of the market, going after the Google Pixelbook and, to a lesser degree, entry level Windows ultrabooks. As far as chromebooks go, it’s surprisingly well specced out; an i5 8250U is expected for the price point and overkill for Chrome OS, while 8 GB of RAM is nice to see in a sea of 4 GB devices. 128 GB of slow eMMC storage is a bit disappointing, as 256 GB SATA SSDs are pretty standard at this price point, but it realistically won’t make a difference for Chrome OS. Thanks to its good screen and overkill performance, it’s one of the best chromebooks for seniors, though it comes at a high price tag.

Why We Like It – Lenovo Yoga C630 Chromebook

The Lenovo Yoga C630 Chromebook is a great high end chromebook with an overkill i5 processor, a decent display (one that’s upgradeable to an excellent 4K display at that), and plenty of extra bells and whistles to provide a top-of-the-line Chrome OS experience.

Pros
  • Processor is more than enough to drive Chrome OS smoothly
  • Good screen
  • Aluminum construction
Cons
  • 128 GB of slow flash storage isn’t great at this price point

Display Type/Resolution

The base model employs a pretty typical 1080p IPS panel, while the upgraded model steps up to a 4K display. Both models offer good colors with decent brightness, and both share the same integral feature–they can flip to turn the device into a large tablet. Coupled with support for Android apps, this feature grants the Lenovo Yoga C630 Chromebook surprising flexibility for a Chromebook, though its large size and proportionately high weight make it clunky to use as a tablet.

Battery Life

For the hardware it’s packing, battery life is decent on the Lenovo Yoga C630 Chromebook. A 56Whr battery paired with a 15W i5 8250U doesn’t sound especially impressive on paper, but Chrome OS’s lightness coupled with the crazy efficiency of Core U allows the laptop to deliver between 6 and 8 hours of continuous use. All but the heaviest users should be pleased with those figures; it’s enough to make it through a typical workday, particularly if you don’t run the brightness at max. If those figures aren’t high enough, the Acer Chromebook 514 is a decent–but worse–alternative; it has a worse (but still solid) display and weaker hardware, but it has very similar build quality and almost twice the battery life.

Weight

Weight is a mixed bag on the Lenovo Yoga C630 Chromebook. As far as 15.6” laptops go, it’s incredibly light; it comes in at 4.2 lbs., which is definitely on the lighter side for 15.6” machines. As far as 2-in-1s go, though, it’s very heavy; 15.6” is awkward enough to use as a tablet, but when it’s in a full laptop chassis that weighs as much as a full laptop, it looks less and less appealing for any level of extended tablet use. If tablet use matters at all to you, consider the HP Chromebook x360 14 instead; it’s smaller and lighter, but has weaker hardware and a worse display.

Durability

Great build quality paired with aluminum construction make for a durable laptop that’ll hold up across even years of use. While it’s no ThinkPad in terms of ruggedness, it’s about what you’d expect of a premium ultrabook–or in this case, chromebook.

Inputs

Port selection is decent but unexceptional. You’re looking at a single USB C port, a single USB A port, a microSD card slot, and of course an audio jack; there’s no HDMI or mini DisplayPort present, which is a bit disappointing on a laptop of this size. As you’d expect from Lenovo, its keyboard is excellent; travel is decent and it overall provides a solid typing experience.

Lenovo Yoga C630 Chromebook Wrap-up

The Lenovo Yoga C630 Chromebook is a surprisingly competent offering overall. It checks every major box, delivering everything you’d expect out of a chromebook without skimping on key specs, for the most part. A larger, faster drive would have been nice to see–eMMC is very dated technology all around, outclassed by even a standard SATA SSD and competing flash standards such as UFS–but doesn’t detract from the experience, but outside of that, for a Google Chrome, basic app, and media consumption machine, you can’t go wrong with it if you can pay the steep price of admission.

Reader Rating0 Votes0
9.2
Expert Rating
Bottom Line

Brady Meyers

Brady Klinger-Meyers is a writer based in Pennsylvania. He regularly contributes to websites such as Hardcore Droid, Gamepur, and Homebli. His work remains primarily in technology, from video game journalism to consumer technology.

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