The electric scooter motor is the powerplant of your electric scooter, the reason why every e-scooter owner needs to learn how to test electric scooter motor functionality. Like any other electric component in top-tier scooters, the motor is prone to fail from time to time due to wear and tear.

KEY TAKEAWAYS:

  • Like any other electric component in your scooter, the motor is prone to fail from time to time due to wear and tear.
  • Electric scooter wires can get burned due to an overload. To effectively check for burned wires, check the controller, motor as well as other electrical components.
  • Using an electric scooter with a faulty motor could be inconvenient and be a potential safety hazard for the rider and other road users.

Ideally, electric motors are durable and built to last with minimal maintenance or service. Using an electric scooter with a faulty motor could be inconvenient and be a potential safety hazard for the rider and other road users.

The Electric Scooter’s Motor

Generally, electric scooters use an electric motor that is usually incorporated into the hub of either the front or the rear wheel. Since the e-scooters hub motor is attached to the wheel that it powers, it can move the wheel efficiently.

They are pretty easy to access and install in case of repair or maintenance service.

How Does an E-Scooter Motor Work?

From its name, it’s easy to understand electric motors are designed for electric scooters. Apart from this, hub motors are also used sometimes. To ensure that the design remains intact and make the e-scooter more reliable and efficient, the electric motors or hubs are usually connected to the electric scooters’ front or rear wheel.

The e-scooter motor works to power the wheels through a shaft, which forces the electric scooter to run. As the hub motor mechanically delivers power to the wheel, they need maintenance from time to time. If ignored, it could lead to the electric scooter motor not running efficiently or at all.

There are different types of hub motors and come in various designs and shapes. The following are commonly used:

Brushed motors: They are rugged and strong and are capable of handling more driving pressure. They are, however, a little less powerful. Brushless engines are, on the other hand, more powerful and also have fewer moving parts. The only disadvantage is they are weak and are incapable of handling adverse road conditions.

Geared hub motors: They are relatively smaller in size and offer increased range but with less power. Gearless motors, on the other hand, are vast and powerful, offering more power and torque to the electric scooter

How to Test Electric Scooter Motor for Issues

It is normal for your electric scooter to fail to run when you start it. This can happen due to several reasons, from simple wire disconnection to a significant internal motor issue. The following are ways to troubleshoot for electric scooter motor problems:

Check on Cables

One of the most common issues that lead to a failing electric scooter motor is loose cables. It is essential to note that your e-scooter is connected to several different parts through wires. If the wiring inside your e-scooter gets cut, it may cause your scooter motor not to function. To determine the issue, carefully examine the wiring. Gently pull the wires, adding tension. In case there are any loose wires, they will come out.

Find any Burned Wires

Electric scooter wires can get burned due to an overload. To effectively check for burned wires, check the controller, motor as well as other electrical components. If you can smell anything, the coils may have overheated and the speed controller damaged. If the plastic insulation on the wire melts the magnet winding, it shorts the circuit, and the electric scooter motor will cease to work. At this point, you’ll want to replace the electric motor.

Inspect the Battery Charger

The battery stores the energy that gives the scooter the ability to run, and the charger charges the battery. If any of these components get damaged, it can affect the electric motor. Therefore, you first need to inspect the battery and then plug it into a power outlet to check for any possibility of light. If the warning light doesn’t come on or just flashes on and off, the charger could be faulty.

Get a multimeter to check the output voltage. The standard voltage level needs to be 24 volts or 36 volts. In case the output is different, your charger could be faulty. Luckily, you can learn how to charge your e-scooter without a charger.

Check the Motor

It’s sporadic to have a malfunctioned motor, but it’s not impossible. A faulty motor can cause the electric scooter to stop functioning. One of the main reasons behind a defective motor is humidity. While the engine housing helps shield the engine, the moisture will often get to the engine and cause it to fail. This is why you should also learn how to clean your e-scooter safely.

F.A.Q.

How does an e-scooter motor work?

Generally, electric scooters use an electric motor that is usually incorporated into the hub of either the front or the rear wheel. Since the e-scooters hub motor is attached to the wheel that it powers, it can move the wheel efficiently.


Can an e-scooter motor get damaged?

It’s sporadic to have a malfunctioned motor, but it’s not impossible. A faulty motor can cause the electric scooter to stop functioning. One of the main reasons behind a defective motor is humidity. While the engine housing helps shield the engine, the moisture will often get to the engine and cause it to fail.


How do I know if my electric scooter battery charger malfunctions?

Plug it into a power outlet to check for any possibility of light. If the warning light doesn’t come on or just flashes on and off, the charger could be faulty.


What are the different types of hub motors?

There are different hub motors and come in various designs and shapes—the brushed, brushless, and gear-hub motors.


STAT: A micro-mobility study fund that shared electric scooters has significantly reduced passenger vehicle usage in the U.S from 2018-2020. If they were not there, walking 43% and personal vehicles 28.5% would still be the viable option (source)

Lawrence Bonk

Lawrence Bonk is a copywriter with a decade of experience in the tech space, with columns appearing in Engadget, Huffington Post and CBS, among others. He has a cat named Cinnamon.

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