If you have recently purchased a top-rated air purifier with activated carbon, you may have one question on your mind. How to reset carbon light on air purifier. Don’t worry. We are here to help.

KEY TAKEAWAYS:

  • It is recommended that you clean and reinsert an activated carbon filter once every month.
  • If your carbon reset light has become illuminated, it typically indicates that the filter is dirty.
  • To reset the carbon light, hold down the button for around five seconds, though this process may vary.

What is an Activated Carbon Air Purifier?

If your carbon light has become illuminated, one of the options of a long term solution is replacing carbon pellets in an air purifier filter. Before you understand how to reset the carbon light on an air purifier, it can be helpful to know what type of air purifier even has a carbon reset light. Activated carbon air purifiers use carbon filters to help filter out airborne pollutants. Carbon, or activated charcoal, has been used as a purification agent for eons.

Insider Tip

Activated carbon air purifiers use carbon filters to help filter out airborne pollutants.

How do Activated Carbon Air Purifiers Work?

Activated carbon air purifiers feature a number of fans that work to pull in air from their immediate surroundings. This air is then pushed into the activated carbon filter, where pollutants are captured and trapped. The purified air is then pushed back into your room. These air purifiers work similarly to any filter-based air purifier.

Why Does Carbon Light Come on?

An activated carbon air purifier’s carbon reset light will become illuminated when the filter needs to be cleaned or replaced, according to the manufacturer’s instructions. This usually happens when the carbon filter has become clogged.

Can You Clean an Activated Carbon Filter?

Yes, you sure can. As a matter of fact, it is recommended that you clean an activated carbon filter once every month. The cleaning process may vary depending on the model of your filter, but it typically requires placing it under gently running water and wiping it down with a microfiber cloth. Afterward, allow the filter to dry for an hour or so before reinserting it into the air purifier. However, If you use a HEPA filter, reset the HEPA air purifier when the filter needs changing.

How Do You Reset the Carbon Light?

Once you have cleaned the filter and reinserted it back into the air purifier, you may notice that the carbon reset light does not automatically turn off. If this is the case, it will require a manual reset. The methods to perform a manual reset may vary depending on the design of your activated carbon air purifier, though most models simply require that you hold down the carbon reset light for five seconds. After that five seconds, the light should go off. You are good to go until the next time your filter needs to be cleaned.

Warning

An activated carbon air purifier’s carbon reset light will become illuminated when the filter needs to be cleaned or replaced, according to the manufacturer’s instructions.

F.A.Q.

Why does my air purifier go from very good to bad?

If you allow your air purifier’s filter to become clogged and dirty, the efficacy will dramatically decrease. Please follow the manufacturer’s instructions when it comes to cleaning and replacing the air filter.


Do air purifiers do a good job?

Most air purifiers are capable little machines, doing an excellent job at purifying the air in rooms within your home. Of course, the efficacy will vary depending on the make and model of your particular air purifier.


Can all activated carbon air filters be cleaned with water?

Most activated carbon filters can be cleaned with water, though some should only be cleaned with a dust rag, while others cannot be cleaned at all. Check with the instructions.



STAT: Bi-directional airflow delivers purified air more effectively throughout a room, and in some cases, has proven to be up to 24% more efficient than traditional air purifiers with vertical airflow. (source)

Lawrence Bonk

Lawrence Bonk is a copywriter with a decade of experience in the tech space, with columns appearing in Engadget, Huffington Post and CBS, among others. He has a cat named Cinnamon.

Related Articles

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *