How to Replace a Vacuum Cleaner Belt

Learning how to replace a vacuum cleaner belt will help save a ton of money in the long run. Replacing your vacuum cleaner can be costly, especially with prices rising every year. If you already purchased a top-tier vacuum cleaner, you probably don’t want to keep spending a lot of money to maintain it. That’s why learning how to do some repairs on your own is such a good idea.

KEY TAKEAWAYS:

  • Installing a broken belt on a vacuum cleaner is easy and should only take a few minutes if you know what you’re doing.
  • You should always order a replacement from the brand or manufacturer rather than purchasing one from a different supplier.
  • Anytime you try and do your own repair jobs you should look into warranties you have to ensure you aren’t going to void the contract.

How to Replace a Vacuum Cleaner Belt

Luckily, learning how to replace a vacuum cleaner belt is a fairly easy process with simple steps. Most people are able to figure out belt replacement with relative ease. For an easy process, keep a spare belt at all times just in case your current vacuum belt breaks. And if you don’t have a spare belt and your vacuum is out of commission, you can still clean your carpet without a vacuum.

Insider Tip

For an easy process, keep a spare belt at all times just in case your current vacuum belt breaks.

1. Gather Your Supplies

There are only a few things that you need to install a replacement belt:

  • Screwdriver
  • Replacement Belt
  • Gloves

2. Get Inside Your Vacuum

To replace the belt, you’ll need to access some internal areas. The part you’ll be getting into is part of the powerhead. This is where floor debris gets sucked up by your vacuum. All you have to do is take your screwdriver and remove the bottom plate, exposing the brush roll area. Sometimes, the only way to fix appliances is to disassemble them. For example, to build a leaf vacuum, you need to disassemble and assemble your lawnmower. As long as you know what you are doing, everything should be fine.

Insider Tip

Having a guide for installation instructions specific to your vacuum will help you figure out the exact steps for your model.

3. Remove the Old Drive Belt

Once you’ve removed the brush roll plate, it’s time to pop out the broken belt. This will also require you to remove the brush roll since the two are connected in most vacuums. Keep in mind, however, that these steps may vary from vacuum to vacuum. Having a guide for installation instructions specific to your vacuum will help you figure out the exact steps for your model.

4. Install the Correct Belt

Lastly, you’ll want to make sure you install the new belt correctly. This will also vary from model to model, and specific directions should be available for your vacuum. Beyond this, keep in mind that there are several types of vacuum belts out there. Make sure you are installing the exact belt you need. Always prioritize ordering through the manufacturer to ensure your vacuum can use the replacement belt you buy.

Warning

Replacing your vacuum cleaner can be costly, especially with prices rising every year.

F.A.Q.

Why do vacuum cleaner belts break?

There are a few reasons why your vacuum cleaner belt broke. Here are a few:

  • General wear and tear from use
  • Incorrect installation of the belt
  • Brush roller blockages

How Can I Tell if it’s Time to Change My Vacuum Cleaner Belt?

A few signs might pop up that indicate it’s time to replace a vacuum cleaner belt. If you all of a sudden notice a loss of power, dirt trailing behind you as you vacuum, or a new, loud noise while using your vacuum, it might be the belt.


How long do vacuum cleaners last?

The lifetime of a vacuum will depend on a variety of factors. Generally, you can expect the median age to be somewhere around eight years.


How Can I Tell That My Belt is About to Break?

It can be challenging to figure out when a drive belt is about to bust. Looking for defects while your vacuum is both on and off will help you eyeball signs of wear.


STAT: Bleach Also known as sodium hypochlorite, simple household bleach (which contains 5.25 percent of sodium hypochlorite, the active ingredient in bleach) can get stains out of grout that the baking soda couldn’t. (source)

Christen Costa

Grew up back East, got sick of the cold and headed West. Since I was small I have been pushing buttons - both electronic and human. With an insatiable need for tech I thought "why not start a blog focusing on technology, and use my dislikes and likes to post on gadgets."

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