If you are wondering how to register a modern electric scooter, you are not alone. Many new scooter-owners have taken to the Internet to find out how to register their scooter or if they have to.

KEY TAKEAWAYS:

  • Depending on where you live, your scooter may have to be registered and you may need a valid license to use one.
  • Check any local rules and regulations by inquiring with a nearby government authority.
  • You may have to purchase scooter insurance, which can be acquired via a number of well-regarded insurance companies.

Licensing and Registration

Each state, city, and municipality may feature its own rules regarding scooter registration and its license. If you do not adhere to these rules, you may be subject to a fine.

Insider Tip

Each city and state will likely have different rules and regulations regarding the registration and licensing of electric scooters.

How to Register and License an Electric Scooter

The exact process to register and license an electric scooter will differ depending on where you live. Still, we have arranged a list of universal tips and guidelines. And if you’re a night rider, here are some tips on how to remove an e-scooter headlight if you want something brighter.

Check With Your Local Government

As previously mentioned, each city and state will likely have different rules and regulations regarding the registration and licensing of electric scooters. It would be a good idea to check in with a local governmental agency. This can be done via phone, online, or by stopping by in person. Anyone affiliated with the organization should readily know the answer to any registration-related questions you may have. As a warning, some states have placed a strict age limit for electric scooter riders, so be sure to gather this information as well.

Insider Tip

Some states and cities require electric scooter operators to have a valid driver’s license or a learning permit.

Get Your License or Permit

Some states and cities require electric scooter operators to have a valid driver’s license or a learning permit. In other words, you will have to head to the DMV and pick up your license or permit. Take whatever test is required by law and acquire the license or permit. Once you have it, you will be good to go and legally able to ride an electric scooter to your heart’s content. If you already have a valid license or permit, you can ignore this step.

Insure the Scooter

Some states will require scooter operators to insure their vehicles as part of the registration process. There are many options when it comes to purchasing scooter insurance. Many well-known companies, including Allstate and State Farm, offer dedicated scooter insurance plans. Choose the best plan for you and pick your favorite benefits. These plans will differ as to their coverage, with some only offering coverage for accidental collisions and bodily harm and others offering coverage for theft, loss, and vandalism. Once your scooter is fully insured, you will be ready to go. Remember that the insurance won’t be of help if your vehicle gets damaged from the rain, so learn about how to weatherproof your e-scooter.

Warning

As a warning, some states have placed a strict age limit for electric scooter riders, so be sure to gather this information as well.

F.A.Q.

What is considered a limited-use motorcycle?

A limited-use motorcycle is typically referred to as a moped. These vehicles can fall under similar restrictions to an electric scooter, depending on where you live.


What do I need to bring to the DMV?

This will vary depending on where you live, but you will generally have to bring in a number of valid forms of identification. It could be a passport, a birth certificate, or any number of other forms of ID.


Do you need insurance for a moped or scooter in California?

Yes, in most cases you will need insurance for a moped or scooter in the state of California. The state also requires scooter riders to have a valid driver’s license or learning permit.



STAT: If your vehicle is called a “moped” but doesn’t go faster than 20 miles per hour, it will likely count as a motorized bicycle under California state law. (source)

Lawrence Bonk

Lawrence Bonk is a copywriter with a decade of experience in the tech space, with columns appearing in Engadget, Huffington Post and CBS, among others. He has a cat named Cinnamon.

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