If you have recently purchased a top-ranked air purifier equipped with a HEPA-type air filter or a true HEPA filter, you may have one question on your mind. How to open a HEPA-type air purifier? Keep reading for useful information.

KEY TAKEAWAYS:

  • To open a HEPA-type air purifier, start by checking with the instructions that accompanied your air purifier upon initial purchase.
  • If you don’t have access to a paper copy of these instructions, visit the company’s web portal and find a PDF.
  • Be as gentle as possible as you open up the external housing of an air purifier.

What’s the Difference Between a True HEPA Filter and a HEPA-Type Filter?

Before you figure out how to open up your HEPA air purifier, it can be helpful to understand the differences between a true or genuine HEPA filter and a HEPA-type filter. HEPA stands for high-efficiency particulate arrestance and it is more of a guideline than an actual type of air filter. In order to be classified as a true HEPA filter, the filter must be able to adequately purify 99.97 percent of pollutants that are larger than 0.3 microns in diameter.

HEPA-type filters do not have to adhere to such a guideline, though they typically clear out around 98 percent of pollutants from the air within a similar diameter. However, for a HEPA filter to be effective, you need to know how to use square footage to measure the room.

Insider Tip

HEPA stands for high-efficiency particulate arrestance and it is more of a guideline than an actual type of air filter. In order to be classified as a true HEPA filter, the filter must be able to adequately purify 99.97 percent of pollutants that are larger than 0.3 microns in diameter.

How to Open a HEPA Type Air Purifier

The actual process of opening up a HEPA-type air purifier will vary depending on the design of your purifier and the reason you are opening it. We have assembled some guidelines and tips to peruse.

Check the Manual

If you are looking to open up an air purifier for the purpose of changing out the filter or for conducting some simple troubleshooting or maintenance, first check on the official instructions that originally accompanied your air purifier. If you no longer have access to the paper instructions, you should visit the company’s web portal and find a PDF version. Most reputable manufacturers maintain a web presence with all of their various sets of instructions.

Insider Tip

If you are looking to open up an air purifier for the purpose of changing out the filter or for conducting some simple troubleshooting or maintenance, first check on the official instructions that originally accompanied your air purifier.

Be Gentle

Whenever you are opening up the external housing of an air purifier, you should be as gentle as possible so as to disturb any crucial components. We recommend going as slowly as possible and keeping track of any screws, clasps, or related accessories that you remove along the way. Most air purifiers can be opened without the need for any tools, however, so this step should be simple.

Close it Back Up

After you are done troubleshooting or replacing a filter, be sure to close the purifier up by performing the same steps in reverse.

Did you know that by reducing the number of airborne allergens and pathogens, air purifiers can help prevent coughing?

Warning

If you no longer have access to the paper instructions, you should visit the company’s web portal and find a PDF version.

F.A.Q.

What are the best HEPA air purifiers?

This will depend largely on personal preference and your individual needs. Look for a HEPA air purifier made by a reputable company that is powerful enough to purify the air in your home.


Where are HEPA filters used?

HEPA filters are used all over the place, from residential settings to commercial settings and beyond. Their overall efficacy rate makes them extremely popular in medical settings.


What are HEPA filters made out of?

There is no set standard for what a HEPA filter has to be made out of, so the materials used in construction can vary wildly from filter to filter. Some materials include glass fibers, animal hair, metallic wools, foils, and more.



STAT: To meet the HEPA standard, a filter is estimated to remove 99.97 percent of particles that are 0.3 microns (or micrometers) in size from the air that passes through them, though this means that particles smaller than 0.3 microns can escape the HEPA filter. (source)

Lawrence Bonk

Lawrence Bonk is a copywriter with a decade of experience in the tech space, with columns appearing in Engadget, Huffington Post and CBS, among others. He has a cat named Cinnamon.

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