If you are trying to wade into the wide world of DIY best air purifiers, you may be sizing up charcoal air purifiers. Keep reading to learn all about how to make a charcoal air purifier and how they work.

KEY TAKEAWAYS:

  • You can easily make some DIY charcoal air purifiers by using activated charcoal.
  • Activated charcoal can be purchase at pet stores, health food stores, industrial supply stores, or online.
  • Simply place a few tablespoons of activated charcoal in a cardboard box, in an ashtray, or on top of a lightweight cloth.

What is a Charcoal Air Purifier?

Before you can make something, you have to learn what it is and how it works. Charcoal air purifiers are devices that filter the air via activated charcoal or carbon. Typically, the carbon or charcoal has been professionally treated, but garden variety charcoal will also work as a filtration device. These filters grab and trap airborne impurities, such as volatile organic compounds (VOCs), common household allergens, bacteria, and more. However, before you start making the charcoal DIY air purifier, you should know if you need an air purifier as this will save you so much time and resources.

Insider Tip

These filters grab and trap airborne impurities, such as volatile organic compounds (VOCs), common household allergens, bacteria, and more.

How to Make Charcoal Air Purifiers

Making activated charcoal air purifiers is rather easy, requiring just a few minutes and some activated charcoal. The biggest thing to consider here is sourcing the activated carbon itself, which can be purchased at pet stores, industrial supply stores, health food stores, and locations throughout the Internet. Besides using the charcoal air purifier, you can also create another DIY air purifier with a powerful box fan so as to increase its filtration capabilities.

Easy Ashtray Purifiers

This one is so easy you won’t even believe it. Just gather ashtrays and small bowls. Gently moisten these ashtrays and bowls and then lay down a few tablespoons of activated charcoal. Place these bowls throughout the room and let them stand overnight. When you wake up they will be miniature air purifiers, ready to be put anywhere in the home. You may want to affix a border surrounding the ashtrays and bowls, so as to keep charcoal from spilling.

Insider Tip

You will be surprised at how effective this method is, even if a cardboard box is not the most attractive piece of home decor.

Cardboard Box Method

This is another easy setup. Find a small cube-shaped cardboard box. Open up the top and place a few tablespoons of activated charcoal inside. Place the box anywhere you need an air purifier. You will be surprised at how effective this method is, even if a cardboard box is not the most attractive piece of home decor.

Charcoal Satchels

This one is the most complicated of the three but is still relatively simple. Grab some lightweight cotton, a ribbon, and some activated charcoal to get started. Use a pair of crafting scissors to cut a piece of lightweight cotton into a circle that is around eight inches in diameter. Place two tablespoons of activated charcoal in the center of the cotton circle. Gather the edges, close them up, and tie them together with a ribbon. You can hang this purifying satchel anywhere.

Warning

The biggest thing to consider here is sourcing the activated carbon itself, which can be purchased at pet stores, industrial supply stores, health food stores, and locations throughout the Internet.

F.A.Q.

How can activated charcoal in air purifiers make my air cleaner?

Yes. Activated charcoal will draw out airborne pollutants and impurities. This substance has been used in China for thousands of years.


What’s the difference between charcoal and activated charcoal?

Activated charcoal is charcoal that has been heated to extremely high temperatures. Regular charcoal has not. You can actually make your own activated charcoal by heating it up.


What is bamboo charcoal?

As the name suggests, bamboo charcoal is charcoal that has been sourced from the bamboo tree. It has been used as an air-purifying agent for thousands of years.



STAT: According to the EPA, wildfire smoke predominantly consists of fine particles in the 0.4 to 0.7-micron range. (source)

Lawrence Bonk

Lawrence Bonk is a copywriter with a decade of experience in the tech space, with columns appearing in Engadget, Huffington Post and CBS, among others. He has a cat named Cinnamon.

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