If you have recently purchased a replacement air filter, you may be wondering how to install an air filter in your best-performing air purifier. That’s where we come in. Keep reading for some instructions and guidelines.

KEY TAKEAWAYS:

  • You should replace air filters according to the manufacturer’s recommendations.
  • Generally speaking, HEPA filters need to be replaced once every six months to a year, though this can vary depending on usage.
  • When replacing an air filter, be sure to wear gloves and a safety mask as you dispose of the used filter.

What is an Air Filter?

Air filters are devices that are typically located inside an air purifier. They work to filter air by running it through multiple layers of strata. Most air filter designs have them keeping ahold of any particles they draw from the air until they are cleaned or replaced.

Insider Tip

Most air filter designs have them keeping ahold of any particles they draw from the air until they are cleaned or replaced.

How to Install Air Filters in Your Air Purifier

The actual process here will differ depending on the make and model of your air purifier and the type of air filter you are replacing. An air purifier will help clean odor, reduce allergens and also stop coughing in its tracks. However, you need to know how to install it so that it can be effective. Here are some of the universal tips and guidelines.

Peruse the Instructions

Your first step should be to look over any instructions that originally accompanied your air purifier. They should give you a step-by-step guide on how to remove the pre-existing air filter and replace it with a new one. If you no longer have a paper copy of these instructions, head to the web portal maintained by the manufacturer of your air purifier. There should be a PDF to download somewhere on the site.

Insider Tip

Your first step should be to look over any instructions that originally accompanied your air purifier.

Remove the Filter From its Housing

Again, the specifics of filter removal will vary depending on the design of your air purifier. It is typically rather easy, however, and does not require any tools. Most modern air purifiers can easily be opened to reveal the air purifier. Do that and then simply remove the filter from the housing. Take care to wear a mask and gloves as you do this, as air filters can house all kinds of nasty particles.

Place in the New Filter

Now you can simply place the new filter into the housing and shut it. Once the housing has been shut, feel free to power on the air purifier and make sure everything seems to be in working order. As a warning, be sure you have purchased the correct replacement filter. Air filters come in a large variety of sizes, types, and overall designs. You need to know how to put a HEPA filter in the air purifier since it is one of the most effective air purifiers. If you purchased the recommended replacement directly from the manufacturer, you will likely be in good shape. Be sure to conduct some research before buying a third-party filter.

Warning

If you no longer have a paper copy of these instructions, head to the web portal maintained by the manufacturer of your air purifier.

F.A.Q.

When exactly do I change my air purifier filters?

This will vary depending on filter type, usage, and a range of other factors. If the “change filter” indicator light is flashing, you will likely have to change out the filter. HEPA filters should be changed once every six months to a year.


Do ionizer air purifiers remove odors?

Ionizers do a decent job at removing odors, though they can create their own odors, as they release ozone into the atmosphere during operation.


Do air purifiers really make you feel better?

Air purifiers can help relieve some symptoms related to allergies, asthma, and related respiratory ailments. They are not miracle workers, however, though they are a good thing to experiment with.



STAT: According to the Environmental Protection Agency, the air indoors where we spend as much as 90 percent of our time can be more polluted than even city smog. (source)

Lawrence Bonk

Lawrence Bonk is a copywriter with a decade of experience in the tech space, with columns appearing in Engadget, Huffington Post and CBS, among others. He has a cat named Cinnamon.

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