Electric scooters have become extremely popular in recent years as technology continues to advance. E-scooters tend to be made from high-grade components, such as aluminum alloy and carbon fiber, though they will break down eventually. In other words, you’ll have to know how to dispose of your electric scooter and get a new one. And that’s when you will need any of the best electric scooters on the market today.

KEY TAKEAWAYS:

  • Electric scooters tend to last three to five years before needing to be disposed of and replaced.
  • If your old scooter is in good working condition, you can sell it on Facebook Marketplace, Craigslist, or eBay.
  • If your scooter is not functioning, you could bring it to your local electronics recycling center.

How Long Do Electric Scooters Last?

On average, a new electric scooter should last around three to five years, though many models will last a good bit longer than even five years. We recommend regular maintenance to lengthen the lifespan of your e-scooter. Also here are some important electric scooter break-in tips that will ramp up your new one until it reaches maximum performance and efficiency.

Insider Tip

On average, a new electric scooter should last around three to five years, though many models will last a good bit longer than even five years.

Disposing of Your Old Electric Scooter

In most locations, you will not be able to simply throw out an old e-scooter with the trash. These are complex pieces of technology with a wide range of material and component types. Here are some general tips and guidelines to help you get rid of an old electric scooter. But just in case it’s malfunctioned, you may want to check the electric scooter push-key starter.

Sell It Online

If the scooter is still functioning, it could be a good idea to sell it online. You can use Facebook Marketplace, Craigslist, eBay, or a number of additional online marketplaces. There are also scooter-related message boards and Facebook groups that will likely include people who may buy your used scooter. Be honest when listing the scooter, taking care to detail any issues that have arisen throughout its use. You should also be wary of scammers, particularly when dealing with Craigslist.

Insider Tip

You can use Facebook Marketplace, Craigslist, eBay, or a number of additional online marketplaces.

Recycling Centers

It is unlikely that you will be able to recycle your scooter in your standard recycling container, though it would not hurt to research local regulations regarding the process. An easy way to dispose of an old electric scooter is to take it to a dedicated recycling center. Most major areas feature a number of recycling centers that specialize in complex pieces of electronics, such as scooters. Depending on what service you use, there could be a small fee involved, so take that into consideration.

Contact the Original Manufacturer

Most major electric scooter manufacturers, such as Razor, have set up their own scooter recycling programs. Contact the original manufacturer of your electric scooter to inquire about these programs. They tend to be free and the company could even send out packing slips and packing boxes if requested. Additionally, some manufacturers partner up with local recycling centers. In other words, you may be able to drop the scooter off and have the fee waived or handled by the scooter’s manufacturer.

Warning

You should also be wary of scammers, particularly when dealing with Craigslist.

F.A.Q.

How can I make recycling/disposing of my batteries as safe as possible?

Bring aged lithium batteries to a recycling center or a big-box retailer that has instituted a similar program, as professionals will know the right way to handle them.


Why can’t I just throw my old devices and batteries away?

These old devices and batteries tend to feature a number of complex components, many of them toxic and dangerous to both people and the environment. Simply throwing them away could put your community at risk.


Do I have to pay any disposal fee?

In some cases, yes, you will have to pay a disposal fee. We recommend calling the recycling center ahead of time to ask about the fee.



STAT: According to Call2Recycle, there are more than 322 million wireless phones, tablets, and e-readers in use in the U.S., with that number expected to double by 2020. (source)

Lawrence Bonk

Lawrence Bonk is a copywriter with a decade of experience in the tech space, with columns appearing in Engadget, Huffington Post and CBS, among others. He has a cat named Cinnamon.

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