How to Delete Pictures From a Digital Camera

If you have recently purchased the best digital camera and began to practice various techniques such as time lapse photography, you may be wondering how to delete pictures from a digital camera. Don’t worry. We have got you covered.

KEY TAKEAWAYS:

  • You can easily delete photos from a digital camera by clicking the delete button on the camera itself.
  • Most cameras will also boast a “delete all” feature, which will be located in the settings somewhere.
  • Other options include plugging the camera into your computer or plugging the memory card into your computer.

Why Delete Photos from a Digital Camera?

The primary reason consumers delete pictures from a digital camera is to clear up space on the memory card or internal storage. RAW files can fill up this memory storage quickly, and deleting some photos can open up room for new images. Another reason is to simply clear out pictures you don’t like.

Insider Tip

The primary reason consumers delete pictures from a digital camera is to clear up space on the memory card or internal storage.

How to Delete Pictures from a Digital Camera

There are a number of ways to delete photos from a digital camera, here are just a few. Keep in mind that the specific steps may differ depending on the make and model of your camera. And if you have an analog device, you may want to learn how to convert an analog camera to a digital camera to not only ease the process but also improve your overall experience.

Delete from the Camera

You should be able to easily discard unwanted private photos on the camera itself. Some even feature a dedicated delete button. If your camera lacks a delete button, head into the system settings to find delete. This should allow you to remove any photos from the camera’s internal memory. As a warning, you may want to import and backup any photos to your computer or related device before pressing that delete button. Your camera may also feature a “delete-all” button which is essentially a format option. Be extremely careful with this. If done prematurely, you will have to break out the recovery software to retrieve photo files.

Insider Tip

You should be able to easily discard unwanted private photos on the camera itself. Some even feature a dedicated delete button.

Delete on Your Computer

You can also easily delete photos from your media management software suite located on your computer. Simply plug in your camera to the computer using a standard USB cable and have at it. Make sure you are using the correct mode with the photo management software. In some cases, you may just have to manually delete photo files from the folder that pops up when the camera connects to the computer. To do this, drag files to the trash. Then go into the trash and delete permanently to get rid of these photo files.

Delete from Memory Card

Your digital camera likely stores image files on a memory card. To delete photos from the SD card, simply remove the card from the camera and plug it into your computer’s memory card reader. Follow the prompts and delete the files.

Warning

As a warning, you may want to import and backup any photos to your computer or related device before pressing that delete button.

F.A.Q.

Why are some methods better than others?

Well, if you delete photos from your computer, it will likely be easier to retrieve them than if you delete them from your camera before importing files to your computer. Make a habit out of backing up your files.


How often should you format?

There is no hard and fast rule when it comes to formatting a memory card. Some photo-buffs wait until it is nearly full, while others like to format the card before each photography session. Use your best judgment.


How do I save photos?

Your photos should save automatically to your camera when you take them. If this is not happening, it could be an issue with your memory card or with your settings.



STAT: People take more than 1.4 trillion photos each year. Yes, you read that right. (source)

Lawrence Bonk

Lawrence Bonk is a copywriter with a decade of experience in the tech space, with columns appearing in Engadget, Huffington Post and CBS, among others. He has a cat named Cinnamon.

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