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How to Cook Rice in a Coffee Maker

Beth Huston Profile image

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Updated June 27, 2022

Learning how to cook rice in a coffee maker can help save counter space and even remove arsenic from rice. In traditional methods, you cook rice in water directly. This preserves the small amounts of arsenic found in the grain.

KEY TAKEAWAYS:

  • To make rice in a coffee maker, simply put a filter in the basket and fill it with the correct measurement of rice. Add in water, start the brew, and you’ll have perfect rice in no time.
  • Having trace amounts of arsenic in food is relatively common and shouldn’t cause concern.
  • The standard method of cooking rice in a pot of water will cause the rice to retain arsenic. Using a coffee pot to cook your rice can help lower the levels of arsenic present.

Multiple foods and even clean water from your tap contain minuscule levels of arsenic. While arsenic from the rice will be largely unharmful, it never hurts to remove what you can. The best coffee maker solution for this is explained in depth below.

Can You Make Any Type of Rice Without a Rice Cooker?

Small amounts of inorganic arsenic occur naturally in both white rice and brown rice. This may sound scary, but the presence of inorganic arsenic is rarely harmful at these extremely low levels.

Using this cooking method means that the hot water passes through the grams of rice, which washes out potentially harmful contaminants. Cooking water may also contain traces of arsenic, compounding the issue when using a pot of water to make rice.

Insider Tip

Washing rice is a great way to combat the harmful effects of any toxic element present.

With a bit of effort, you can do this basic cooking task without a traditional rice cooker. Be careful not to mess up the directions, or you may break your appliance. If you mess up, finding out how to dispose of an old coffee maker will come in handy.

STEP 1

Clean your appliance thoroughly if you haven’t already, focusing on the filter basket. Then, take out the type of rice you’re going to use. This cooking method works best for instant rice.

STEP 2

You’ll need to put in anywhere from a cup of water to a few cups of water into the reservoir. You can use hot water or cold water for this.

STEP 3

Follow the directions for your specific rice. Even if you learn how to connect a water line to your coffee maker, you still need to measure the right amount for the recipe.

STEP 4

Take out your coffee filters, and place one in the filter basket. If you have a reusable version to filter coffee, take it out and use a disposable filter instead. Trace amounts of aromatic coffee can throw off the flavor of your rice.

STEP 5

Hit the brew button and allow it to run. A typical brew cycle will generally provide the proper cooking time, but you may need to adjust slightly for preference.

STEP 6

Take out your cooked rice and prepare it however you like. Using some heavy cream and chocolate chips can create a sweet treat, especially with a packet of fruit jam. Of course, everybody enjoys the buttery goodness of rice with a smidge of butter mixed in.

F.A.Q.S

What else can I cook in my coffee machine?

There are tons of cheap food you can make in a coffee pot:

  • Steamed Broccoli
  • Green Beans
  • Hot Chocolate
  • Chocolate Fondue
  • Hard-Boiled Eggs

How do I make my morning cup of coffee taste better?

Clean out coffee residue daily from your coffee machine. You should also use high-quality coffee grounds, as well. Coffee grinders will help you achieve the correct consistency for your brewing method.


Do I need to clean the hot plate on my appliance?

You should wipe your coffee maker plate after every use, especially if there’s been a spill or the hot water overflows. This keeps the coffee maker plate from developing rust.


What other products does the rice industry produce?

There is a wide variety of products made from rice:

  • Rice Milk
  • Infant Rice Cereal
  • Rice Vinegar

STAT: Inorganic and Organic arsenic occurs naturally in the environment. (source)

Warning

According to soil sciences, rice grown in flood plains is more likely to contain harmful amounts of arsenic.

Beth Huston Profile image