Learning how to connect a projector to a speaker only takes a few minutes. You’ll find most information in the product manual for either device. No matter the connectivity type, there are a few steps that remain the same. The biggest hurdle in finding the best projectors is the research involved. The second biggest hurdle is figuring out audio connections and the setup involved.

KEY TAKEAWAYS:

  • The first step in making the projector to speaker connection is figuring out whether you’re dealing with a wireless speaker or a model that requires manual connections
  • There are different audio connection types, so check your model’s tech specs to figure out which speaker cables to use with your projector.
  • Most manufacturers offer a customer service line you can call to help walk you through troubleshooting the difficulties you run into.

Guide to Connecting Projectors and Speakers

To connect via streaming devices, follow the directions included. You should always keep these booklets for instruction purposes. The most crucial connection to have is a compatible one, so make sure you have complimentary connection ports on both devices. For the best combination of audiovisual products, read our article on “How to connect soundbar to a projector.

Insider Tip

Having a wireless or Bluetooth connection can help you keep your home theatre tidy by removing the mess of wires.

STEP 1 Confirm a Wireless or Wired Connection

For manual connections, you’ll need to make sure the audio connection types match up. While some projectors offer multiple connection types, others will rely on one type alone. Some of these audio output connection types include:

  • HDMI Cable
  • Built-in AUX Input (Headphone Jack)
  • Channel RCA Connection
  • Analog Video Connection

STEP 2 Connect Your Audiovisual Products

Once you figure out the audio connection types involved, it’s time to hook up your speaker to your projector. Power off both devices before making audio output connections. For Bluetooth tech, you’ll follow the directions in your instruction booklets. Most Bluetooth speakers will make a confirmation sound upon successful pairing. Audiovisual connection isn’t all that matters, however. If the question, “What to use for a projector screen?” comes up, there are multiple options out there you’ll love.

STEP 3 Enjoy Additional Devices as Desired

Whether your audio cable is connected or your Bluetooth tech is set up, you’re now ready to enjoy the same sound waves you might find in a cinema. Adding a Blu-Ray player, wireless streaming stick, or video streaming box into the mix can up the ante even more. There are tons of options for creating the perfect home theatre.

Troubleshooting Projector to Speaker Connections

Sometimes you might run into trouble when looking for an audio signal or getting both devices into the “pairing mode” required for a wireless connection. When troubleshooting, it’s essential to look into the instructional manual for both devices. If that fails, reach out to the brand or a connection specialist in your area.

Warning

Ensure that you clarify what connection type the speaker you purchase has and whether it’s compatible with your projector.

F.A.Q.S

How do I get sound from my projectors to my speakers wirelessly?

Some speakers require you to use a coaxial cable or even a headphone jack to connect. For a wireless connection, choose a Bluetooth tech for both your projector and speaker.


How do I create a surround sound experience?

Make sure you don’t have poor-quality speakers. The audio device you invest in decides how convincing your audiovisual products will be. Movies are easier to immerse in when you have great sound quality.


Should I buy external speakers for a portable projector?

If your projector has built-in speakers, check their audio quality. Poor quality speakers can ruin an experience even with the best streaming devices money can buy.


Are complex home entertainment connections worth it?

Investing in internal speakers dramatically improves your experience. Even single soundbars can produce far better audio quality than a built-in speaker system.


STAT: The phone jack was patented back in 1884. (source)

Beth Huston

Beth has an eye for all things editorial, overshadowed only by her drive to understand everything through dedicated research. You can find Beth reading fantasy in her spare time... especially if it's by Brandon Sanderson.

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