How Many Watts Does an Electric Scooter Need

Modern electric scooters are available in a wide variety of wattages, leading some consumers to wonder how many watts does an electric scooter need. This depends on your preferences as we will discuss below.

KEY TAKEAWAYS:

  • Electric scooters come in a wide variety of wattages, from 250-watts all the way up to 5,000-watts.
  • When deciding how many watts you need, consider the scooter’s top speed and your body weight.
  • Be sure to check local rules and regulations, as they can mandate a scooter manufacturer hobble the motor to decrease the maximum speed.

What is Watts on an Electric Scooter?

Watts are an essential data point when it comes to a scooter’s motor and its overall performance. Watts refers to the amount of energy the motor can handle at a single time, which can translate to a fast top speed.

This watt rating should not be confused with a peak watt rating, which denotes how much energy the scooter’s motor can handle for a short period of time. Peak watt ratings are typically used to illustrate how good the scooter will be at climbing hills and performing other intensive tasks that typically involve short bursts of energy.

Insider Tip

Watts refers to the amount of energy the motor can handle at a single time, which can translate to a fast top speed.

How Many Watts Does an Electric Scooter Need?

This depends on what you are looking for with a scooter. The watts available to a scooter can help determine a vehicle’s top speed, though that is not always the case. This top speed can fluctuate no matter the wattage of your scooter’s motor. Generally speaking, if you are an adult of an average weight, you should opt for a scooter of at least 500 watts. Modern scooters go all the way up to 5,000 watts, so there is a lot of wiggle room there. These modern vehicles also boast a longer battery lifespan, so that’s something you should consider.

Factors that Influence a Scooter’s Speed

Watts certainly impact a scooter’s top speed, but so do other factors. Here just a few.

Insider Tip

If you are an adult of an average weight, you should opt for a scooter of at least 500 watts.

Local Laws

Cities and states typically issue their own laws regarding the top speed allowed by an electric scooter. The manufacturers will have to adhere to these laws by instituting speed caps on the motors they make. In other words, your 5,000-watt scooter may be physically able to reach speeds up to 60 mph, but the motor will be intentionally hobbled to cap it at 20 to 28 mph. We recommend checking in with your local government for the latest scooter regulations. And if you’re buying one for your little ones, read about how old you have to be to ride an electric scooter.

Overall Load Carried

Most scooters feature a maximum weight limit. Adhering to this limit will ensure that the scooter’s motor can reach top speeds. If you regularly exceed the weight limit, the motor will become taxed and the max speed could decrease over time. When calculating your weight, be sure to include items you are carrying or hauling.

Warning

Your 5,000-watt scooter may be physically able to reach speeds up to 60 mph, but the motor will be intentionally hobbled to cap it at 20 to 28 mph.

F.A.Q.

How much battery capacity do scooters have?

The battery capacity of electric scooters will vary nearly as much as wattages. Budget-friendly scooters can last just six to ten miles per charge, while some models can go as long as 60 miles per charge.


What motor types are used in electric scooters?

There are essentially two competing motor types commonly used in electric scooters. There are brushed direct current (DC) motors and brushless DC electric motors. Each motor type has its own set of unique advantages and disadvantages.


What’s the best place to ride a scooter: sidewalk, bike lane, or street?

Most local ordinances restrict electric scooters from riding on the sidewalk. That leaves the bike lane as your safest bet, though some riders may opt to ride on the street.



STAT: Most e-scooter batteries sold in North America are lithium-ion, which will provide a minimum of 500 full charge cycles at which point the battery will hold about 80% of its original capacity. (source)

Lawrence Bonk

Lawrence Bonk is a copywriter with a decade of experience in the tech space, with columns appearing in Engadget, Huffington Post and CBS, among others. He has a cat named Cinnamon.

Related Articles

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *