If you are on the fence regarding purchasing a brand new electric scooter, you may be wondering exactly what one of these contraptions is good for and how it can help you in your day-to-day life.

KEY TAKEAWAYS:

  • Electric scooters have steadily increased in popularity in recent years, and for several good reasons.
  • These e-scooters are purpose-built for running small errands and for performing short daily commutes.
  • Electric scooters can help consumers reduce their carbon footprints, as they use electricity and not gasoline.

What is an Electric Scooter?

Before understanding their best use case scenarios, it can be helpful to understand exactly what an electric scooter is. Simply put, an e-scooter is a motorized personal transportation vehicle that features an electric motor. These scooters tend to have two wheels and charge via a standard power outlet.

Insider Tip

E-scooters will cost you anywhere from $100 to $400, with some high-grade models costing around $1,000.

Benefits of Electric Scooters

There are a number of benefits to purchasing and regularly riding an electric scooter. Here are just a few.

Great for Errands and Short Commutes

Modern electric scooters are a fantastic option when it comes to performing errands and short daily commutes. They tend to be fairly light, foldable, and easy to store once you arrive at your office or at the site of an errand. Some modern scooters even come with attached baskets, for the purpose of holding groceries and related items. While a great option for short commutes, you may want to examine the scooter’s maximum range before taking it out for a lengthy commute.

Insider Tip

There are variances within each motor type, but a 350W motor should be able to handle inclines up to 10 degrees.

They Can Help You Save Money

Electric scooters are more expensive than manually powered scooters, but they are still inexpensive when compared to automobiles, motorcycles, and other forms of transportation. E-scooters will cost you anywhere from $100 to $400, with some high-grade models costing around $1,000. You should also factor in the cost of gasoline if you are considering using a scooter to perform daily commutes and errands. Electric scooters run on electricity and do not need an external fuel source. You will likely have to purchase some safety gear, such as a helmet, knee pads, and arm pads. And if your vehicle does not run, you will most likely need to know how to repair the electric scooter controller.

Scooters are Environmentally Friendly

If you are looking to reduce your overall carbon footprint, buying and using an electric scooter can be a great first step. These scooters use electric motors, so they have no need for fossil fuels. The cost of powering an electric scooter is around one percent of powering a fuel-efficient car.

These Vehicles are Fun

Most importantly, electric scooters are fun. You can feel the wind in your hair as you ride and you will not be stopped by automobile traffic, as you can likely just switch to the sidewalk. You will also be amazed at the degree slope that e-scooters can take.

Warning

You will likely have to purchase some safety gear, such as a helmet, knee pads, and arm pads.

F.A.Q.

Will electric scooters reduce car traffic?

This depends on the adoption rate. If many millions of people decide to use electric scooters instead of automobiles, then car traffic will be reduced. If only a fraction of those people adopt e-scooters, then car traffic will likely remain static.


Are electric scooters safe? Do I need a helmet?

Generally speaking, electric scooters are pretty safe, as the top speeds max out at around 15 to 20 miles per hour. Having said that, you should always wear protective gear while riding an electric scooter, including a helmet.


Are electric scooters good for cities?

In some ways, yes. The more people that adopt electric scooters as their primary mode of transportation, the better off large cities will be.



STAT: Data gathered from French cities shows that 44% of local e-scooter users would have walked had the scooters not been available and 30% would have used public transport. (source)

Lawrence Bonk

Lawrence Bonk is a copywriter with a decade of experience in the tech space, with columns appearing in Engadget, Huffington Post and CBS, among others. He has a cat named Cinnamon.

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