How Does a Water Air Purifier Work?

There are many different kinds of air purifiers out there, including water air purifiers, which are otherwise known as water revitalizers. How does a water air purifier work? Here is everything you need to know. You will also learn more from reading our buying guide on the best air purifiers.

KEY TAKEAWAYS:

  • Water-based air purifiers, otherwise known as air revitalizers, are extremely effective at filtering out impurities from the air.
  • Think of the water here as an air filter, as they both serve the same purpose when it comes to filtration.
  • Water air purifiers do not require filters, so maintenance tends to be on the easier end.

Water Can Purify the Air?

Yes. Water is one of the most effective substances on the planet for purifying the air. Have you ever noticed how fresh the air feels after a rainstorm? That is the magic of water’s innate air purification qualities. Water is naturally sticky and will capture and trap a wide variety of potentially harmful airborne particles.

Insider Tip

Water is one of the most effective substances on the planet for purifying the air.

How Does a Water Air Purifier Work?

Basically, a water air purifier will use fans to push air into and through a layer of water. The water will hold on to any impurities in the air, and the filtered air will be pushed back into its immediate surroundings. Think of the water as an air filter.

Benefits of Using a Water Revitalizer

There are a number of benefits to going with water as your preferred air purification method. Here are a few.

Built-in Humidification

One of the key advantages of choosing a water-based air purifier is the fact that these models will automatically humidify any room they are placed in. Humidity is just a metric by wish moisture is measured, after all. This will cut down on overall home appliance costs, as these devices will essentially be two-in-one appliances that purify the air and humidify the room. Experts agree that any indoor setting should feature a humidity level of 40 to 60 percent.

Insider Tip

Water is naturally sticky and will capture and trap a wide variety of potentially harmful airborne particles.

Maintenance is a Breeze

These water air purifiers are easy to clean and maintain, as they have no filters to keep an eye on. Just empty out the water basin every now and then you are good to go. They are also exceptionally easy to use. Fill up the water basin with fresh water, power it on, and wait. You will find that your home has purified air in no time at all. If you’re looking to purify air in all the rooms in your home, read about the air purifiers that can clean more than one room.

Can be Used With Essential Oils

If you want to get into the world of aromatherapy, you can add some essential oils to the water basin, such as lavender. This will add a pleasing scent to your home. Be sure to experiment first, as some essential oils could irritate allergies or simply be unpleasant to smell.

If a HEPA-style filter is more your speed, you might also be interested in checking out the Air Innovations Max Clean Compact Air Purifier.

Warning

Be sure to experiment first, as some essential oils could irritate allergies or simply be unpleasant to smell.

F.A.Q.

Are water-based air purifiers effective?

They sure are, though they are not miracle workers. Water-based air purifiers will do a good job with common household allergens and certain bacteria and virus particles.


How do air purifiers and humidifiers impact your health?

It’s not good to breathe in overly dry air or to breathe in airborne pollutants. As such, both air purifiers and humidifiers should impact your overall health positively.


Can air purifiers filter the outdoor air that enters your home?

Air purifiers can purify any air, no matter where it comes from. However, the outside world has so much air that it will easily overwhelm a standard air purifier.



STAT: Air purifiers with true HEPA filters are able to remove 99.97% of air pollutants of up to 0.3 microns which includes airborne viruses. (source)

Lawrence Bonk

Lawrence Bonk is a copywriter with a decade of experience in the tech space, with columns appearing in Engadget, Huffington Post and CBS, among others. He has a cat named Cinnamon.

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