If you are a smoker or live with one, you may have one question on your mind. How do you clean tar air purifier filters? Don’t worry. We have got you covered when it comes to cleaning tar from your filters and giving you a list of the best air filters. Keep reading for pertinent information.

KEY TAKEAWAYS:

  • Those who smoke indoors will experience a buildup of tar on their air purifiers over time.
  • You should clean and maintain your air filters according to the manufacturer’s instructions. For instance, activated carbon filters should be cleaned once every month.
  • Some companies make specialized filters that have been purpose-built for capturing tar.

How Does an Air Filter Become Clogged up With Tar?

Tar is a natural byproduct of smoke, be it from a cigarette, vape, or a drug such as marijuana. Filter-based air purifiers use fans to draw in this smoke where it is run through the filter. As the filter is processing and purifying the smoke, tar can begin to accumulate. Over time, the filter can become clogged up with tar. , read this article.

Insider Tip

Filter-based air purifiers use fans to draw in this smoke where it is run through the filter. As the filter is processing and purifying the smoke, tar can begin to accumulate.

How Do You Clean Tar From an Air Purifier?

You can clean your permanent air filter but the specific process will vary depending on the make and model of air purifier you have. We have assembled some universal guidelines to follow when looking to eliminate tar from an air purifier filter.

Clean According to Instructions

Air filters all have different instructions regarding the cleaning process, and some cannot be cleaned at all. Dig out the instructions that accompanied your air purifier and follow them to the letter. Generally speaking, HEPA filters cannot be cleaned and must be disposed of and replaced every six months to one year, though tar can hasten the need for a replacement. Electrostatic and activated carbon filters should be cleaned once every month, typically with a gentle stream of water and a microfiber cloth. Be sure to allow your filter adequate time to dry out before reinserting it into the air purifier.

Insider Tip

Be sure to allow your filter adequate time to dry out before reinserting it into the air purifier.

Get a Specialized Filter

Some modern air purifiers can be equipped with highly specialized filters that excel at removing tar without becoming clogged. These filters come in a variety of shapes and sizes and are made to be used with most filter-based air purifiers. You can find tar-specific air filters available for HEPA purifiers and activated carbon purifiers. Before you purchase a filter made by a third party, double-check for integration and efficacy.

Don’t Smoke Indoors

This is an obvious one, but refraining from smoking indoors will eliminate any tar buildup in your air filter. You can institute a no-smoking rule for any guests as well. Before long, your air filters will be completely free from tar. Keep in mind that other than tar that you can also clean bad odor from your air purifier.

Warning

HEPA filters cannot be cleaned and must be disposed of and replaced every six months to one year, though tar can hasten the need for a replacement.

F.A.Q.

What is the best air purifier for cigarette smoke and cigar smell?

To eliminate cigarette smoke and nasty cigar smells from the home, go for a HEPA filter or an activated carbon filter. Both have been proven to be effective when it comes to removing smoke and its byproducts.


Can air purifiers help with secondhand smoke?

Air purifiers can certainly help with secondhand smoke, though we would still recommend making any indoor smokers go outside before they light up. No air purifiers will be 100 percent successful when it comes to eliminating secondhand smoke.


Does a HEPA filter remove smoke?

HEPA filters do trap and contain particles of smoke, though consistently doing so will hasten the need for a filter replacement.



STAT: “True HEPA” filters are the best type for smoke removal because they’re specially designed to remove 99.97% particles that are 0.3 microns in diameter. (source)

Lawrence Bonk

Lawrence Bonk is a copywriter with a decade of experience in the tech space, with columns appearing in Engadget, Huffington Post and CBS, among others. He has a cat named Cinnamon.

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