If you have been shopping around for a commercial-grade air purifier for your office or professional location, you may be wondering “how do the best air purifiers for commercial work?” We are here to provide all the answers you need.

KEY TAKEAWAYS:

  • Commercial air purifiers feature a number of core technologies, some of which align with what can be found with residential air purifiers.
  • Many commercial air purifiers use a HEPA filter, which can trap 99.97 percent of airborne particles above 0.3 microns in diameter.
  • Other types of commercial air purifiers include a thermodynamic sterilizing system (TSS), activated carbon purifiers, and ionizers.

What Are Commercial Air Purifiers?

As the name suggests, commercial air purifiers are air filtration products intended for use in a commercial setting. They are typically found in offices, medical clinics, warehouses, and any other professional location that demands clean and filtered air.

How Do Commercial Air Purifiers Work?

Commercial air purifiers work in a similar way to their homebound cousins, residential air purifiers. They typically include an air filter of some kind and a series of fans that push air into the purifier, into the filter, and then out of the purifier once freshened. Commercial air purifiers tend to be larger and louder than their residential-based counterparts, which is something to consider.

Insider Tip

Commercial air purifiers work in a similar way to their homebound cousins, residential air purifiers.

Types of Commercial Air Purifiers

There are numerous types of commercial air purifiers. Many of these types, such as HEPA, feature technologies that work similarly to what is found in residential air purifiers. Others, however, use technology that is not typically found with home-based unit.

HEPA Air Purifiers

Commercial air purifiers that have been equipped with a true HEPA filter (or several) are extremely popular. HEPA stands for high-efficiency particular arrestance and these filters are fantastic at capturing and trapping small particles. HEPA is more of a standard than actual technology. In order to qualify as a true HEPA filter, it must be able to capture 99.97 percent or more of particles sized at 0.3 microns in diameter or larger. This efficiency makes them great for allergens, odor reduction, and certain bacteria and germs. Many volatile organic compounds and certain virus particles will be smaller than 0.3 microns in diameter, so they may not become trapped by the filter.

Generally speaking, HEPA filters must be disposed of and replaced every six months to one year and cannot be cleaned and reinserted back into the purifier. Our guide to understanding how air filters work in your home can lend some additional insight.

TSS Technology

TSS stands for thermodynamic sterilizing system and it is a technology unique to the world of commercial air purifiers, as you cannot typically find a residential purifier that uses TSS technology. These purifiers use extreme heat to kill microorganisms, including spores, bacteria, virus particles, germs, and more. This has made them a popular form of air purifier in medical clinics and doctor’s offices.

TSS air purifiers use fans to pull in air from its immediate surroundings, where this air undergoes the thermodynamic sterilization process. There is no need to worry about excess heat when using a TSS air purifier, as it does not heat up the atmosphere, just the small patch of air that enters the system.

Insider Tip

In order to qualify as a true HEPA filter, it must be able to capture 99.97 percent or more of particles sized at 0.3 microns in diameter or larger.

Activated Carbon Air Purifiers

These air purifiers use an activated carbon filter to neutralize extreme odors, common allergens, certain bacteria, and more. Activated carbon filters are not quite as efficient as HEPA filters, but they can typically be washed and reinserted instead of replaced, saving the office manager a bit of money in the long run.

Ionizer or Ionic Air Purifier

Ionizers, otherwise known as ionic air purifiers, release negatively charged ions into the air, which bond with airborne particles and pull them to the ground. They tend to be a good option for those with large office space, as they are not limited by the power and speed of internal fans, as some ionizers don’t even use fans. Ionic air purifiers can often be found in hybrid combination units that use an ionizer and another form of filtration.

The only downside when it comes to ionizers is the fact that they also release a fair bit of ozone into the air as they work. Ozone can cause negative health consequences when someone is exposed for a long time.

Warning

Commercial air purifiers tend to be larger and louder than their residential-based counterparts, which is something to consider.

F.A.Q.

How do UV air purifiers clean the air?

UV air purifiers use focused beams of ultraviolet light to sterilize potentially harmful air particles. In a way, this technology works similarly to a thermodynamic sterilization system.


Do air purifiers prevent coronavirus?

Air purifiers do not prevent coronavirus, but some HEPA filters can successfully trap coronavirus particles until they die off of their own accord. Certain ionizers and UV air purifiers have been proven to kill coronavirus particles floating in the air. However, they will do nothing about particles that have floated onto a surface.


Which air purifier is most popular?

Generally speaking, HEPA filters are the most popular type of air purification system, given their stellar track record.



STAT: Industrial HEPA filters are capable of capturing 99.97% of all sub-micron size particles, preventing occupants of a building from inhaling them. (source)

Lawrence Bonk

Lawrence Bonk is a copywriter with a decade of experience in the tech space, with columns appearing in Engadget, Huffington Post and CBS, among others. He has a cat named Cinnamon.

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