For home bakers everywhere, they can only fix the struggle of making freshly ground grain flour with the right tool. So, one should consider a grain mill vs. blender to make a great batch of flour. Of course, the best blender should handle the grinding process. Still, more serious sourdough bread bakers might want a specialized kitchen appliance.

KEY TAKEAWAYS:

  • A grain mill is a tool that grinds types of grain into flour for baking or butter. Basic models have an open top and a manual crank.
  • A blender is a kitchen appliance that uses an electric motor to chop solid food with spinning metal blades.
  • For a baker or serious hobbyist, go with a grain mill. That said, the best blenders will be able to make flour that is just as fine.

Grain Mill vs. Blender Compared

You are trying to decide which tool belongs on your kitchen counter: a powerful blender or a grain mill. These two tools can tackle many types of grain and produce cups of flour. You can even use both tools to make homemade peanut butter. That said, compare a grinder vs. a blender for making flour dough if you’re in a pinch.

Explaining Grain Mills

A grain mill, also called a gristmill, is a grinding tool that’s been around since around 71 B.C. Grain mills work to grind something like cups of wheat berries into wheat flour. Most have an open-top instead of a glass or plastic jar. While the classic grain mill is much larger than home models, the idea is still the same, but they fit on a kitchen counter.

Benefits of Grain Mills

If you are a baker specializing in, expensive grain or run a grain mill shop, you cannot go wrong with a grain mill. Older grain mills require the user to spin a crank, but modern models work automatically and have an airtight container.

Drawbacks of Grain Mills

A lot of older grain mills have an open-top, which could lead to dusty batches of flour. In addition, some grain mills will break down after grinding oily nuts, so no flaxseed. Also, an automatic grain blender is quite expensive compared to a basic manual model.

Insider Tip

Store your flour in a dry container, so it doesn’t clump or spoil.

Explaining Blenders

A blender is an essential cooking tool made up of a motor base, blender container, and sharp blades. A high-speed blender can make a smooth cup of flour inside the airtight container from whichever type of grain you choose.

Benefits of Blenders

A high-powered blender is a go-to tool for making larger batches of creamy peanut butter or frozen drinks. In addition, there are proven health benefits from the types of foods possible with a blender. The best model is a high-speed blender with blade grinder attachments.

Drawbacks of Blenders

While a blender is more versatile than a mill, basic models cannot match the fine grind of a premium grain mill. In addition, the blades can sometimes be too powerful, heating up and sometimes burning the grain.

Which is Better?

As an all-purpose tool, the blender is far superior. In addition to making flour, a blender can make frozen drinks and puree soup. A grain mill is a specialized tool for bakers and commercial kitchens. While they don’t do much else, they are fantastic for making flour blends.

Warning

Never put oily nuts into a traditional grain mill, as the oils will gunk up the inner mechanisms of the device.

F.A.Q.

Can I use a coffee grinder to mill grain?

You can use a coffee grinder to mill grain, but your flower will be very coarse, and it can only handle a cup of grain at a time. You can also use a food processor.


What kind of wheat berries should I use?

The type of wheat berries you choose depends on the kind of bread you want to make. For example, certain berries make soft bread, while others make hard bread.


What are wheat berries?

Wheat berries are small red or white berries that look like kernels of corn. Grain mills crush them to produce fresh flour.



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Christen Costa

Grew up back East, got sick of the cold and headed West. Since I was small I have been pushing buttons - both electronic and human. With an insatiable need for tech I thought "why not start a blog focusing on technology, and use my dislikes and likes to post on gadgets."

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