If you are looking for a new job, you have probably checked out the site called Glassdoor. However, can this site be trusted? Are there fake Glassdoor reviews written by management instead of average employees? Keep reading to learn the truth about fraudulent company reviews.

KEY TAKEAWAYS:

  • Shady business managers will often coerce employees into writing overly gushing reviews on Glassdoor.
  • To spot a fake review, look for spikes in volume. If hundreds of positive reviews come in during a short period of time, they may be fake.
  • You should also thoroughly read the copy of the review to gauge whether or not it feels like an actual sentiment.

What is Glassdoor?

Glassdoor is a review site in which current and former employees can anonymously write about the employer. In theory, it is a good way for prospective employees to know what they are about to be in for when accepting a new job. It can also be a way for current employees to vent frustrations due to poor management and the like.

Insider Tip

Companies do not tend to hire content farms to spam the site with a massive onslaught of fake reviewers. Typically, however, they merely task current employees to make sure their reviews are overly enthusiastic.

Does Glassdoor Have a Problem With Fake Reviews?

While we wouldn’t go as far as to say that Glassdoor has a problem with fake reviews, they certainly exist. Though calling them fake reviews is a bit misleading. Companies do not tend to hire content farms to spam the site with a massive onslaught of fake reviewers. Typically, however, they merely task current employees to make sure their reviews are overly enthusiastic. That way, it’s technically a “legitimate” review, though it may have been coerced on some level. This is similar to the fake Elsevier journals case that happened during the years 2000 to 2005.

How to Spot Fake Glassdoor Reviews

Here are some sure-fire ways to spot a fake Glassdoor review before you start a new job at a potentially shady company.

Insider Tip

If employees have been tasked by management to write favorable reviews at Glassdoor, it will likely be part of a larger initiative to boost the company’s overall brand.

Look for Review Spikes

If employees have been tasked by management to write favorable reviews at Glassdoor, it will likely be part of a larger initiative to boost the company’s overall brand. In other words, check out when the reviews were posted. If they trickle in the usual way, once every couple of weeks for instance, then the reviews are likely real. If they all come in at once, say 100 within a one-week period, then it is likely that employees have been coerced to write overly gushing reviews. It is an unfortunate reality that even some Fortune 500 companies have adopted this nefarious practice. This is also the case with most e-commerce platforms like fake Airbnb reviews.

Look for Fake-Sounding Copy

Trust your instincts here. If the copy reads fake or overly enthusiastic, then it just may be fake.e It does not behoove shady business managers to coerce employees to write three or even four-star reviews. They will want five-star reviews and they will want those reviews to be gushing. If the copy just seems like a chirpy cheerleader wrote it, and not an actual employee, then it is likely fake.

F.A.Q.

What kind of bad reviews can be challenged and removed from Glassdoor?

Any review can be challenged, but you must prove that the review violates Glassdoor guidelines for it to be actually removed.


Can I control the reviews for my business?

You cannot control the reviews for your business on Glassdoor. The whole point of the service is to offer employees an anonymous way to discuss company practices.


Can you flag a Glassdoor review?

Yes, you can easily flag a Glassdoor review. This can be done by an employee, a garden variety user, or even business owners and management.



STAT: Glassdoor rejects 5 percent to 10 percent of reviews for violating its guidelines, which bar reviews from fake accounts. Suspected “ballot box stuffing” could also lead the company to nix reviews. (source)

Lawrence Bonk

Lawrence Bonk is a copywriter with a decade of experience in the tech space, with columns appearing in Engadget, Huffington Post and CBS, among others. He has a cat named Cinnamon.

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