Easy To Clean Air Purifier - Washable Filter Air Purifiers

If you are thinking of buying a new air purifier, you may be wondering about any hidden maintenance costs, especially regarding the air filter. Are there easy to clean air purifiers? How do you know you have the best air purifier? That’s what we are here to tell you.

KEY TAKEAWAYS:

  • Some air purifiers can be easy to clean, as they feature washable air filters.
  • One such type of air purifier is an electrostatic air purifier. Electrostatic filters can be washed by hand and should be done so every month.
  • HEPA filters should not be washed, but can simply be tossed in the trash when clogged, though you will have to purchase a replacement.

Are There Easy-Clean Air Purifiers?

When it comes to air filters, the easiest option to clean is an electrostatic filter. Unlike HEPA filters, which need to be removed and replaced once every six months, electrostatic filters can be cleaned by hand once every month. This makes them an extremely economical choice, as HEPA filters can be expensive.

Insider Tip

When it comes to air filters, the easiest option to clean is an electrostatic filter.

Other Options for Easy to Clean Air Purifiers

Electrostatic air filters are not your only option when it comes to air purifiers that are easy to clean and maintain. Here are some other choices.

HEPA Filters

HEPA filters are the easiest to clean of all, as they do not need to be cleaned at all. Every six months to a year, simply pop out the filter and throw it in the trash. Of course, you will have to replace it with a brand new HEPA filter every six months to a year. In other words, they are extremely easy to clean but can get expensive when you consider habitual replacements. That being said, they’re great at reducing symptoms of pet allergies and removing dust and other allergens from the air. There are certain filters that have been branded as HEPA and as being washable, but they are typically not genuine HEPA filters.

Activated Carbon Filters

Some activated carbon filters can be hand-cleaned when they clog up. This can be done by running the filter under running water for a few moments until it looks clear. We recommend cleaning an activated carbon filter every month or so, though will depend on the intensity of use. It is worth noting that not every activated carbon filter is washable, so be sure to read the labels on the air purifier and look for one that clearly denotes that the integrated filter is washable.

Warning

It is worth noting that not every activated carbon filter is washable, so be sure to read the labels on the air purifier and look for one that clearly denotes that the integrated filter is washable.

Ionic Purifiers and UV Purifiers

Both of these types of air purifiers do not typically include a filter, so there will be no cleaning that will need to be done. We still recommend that you regularly clean the exterior of the purifier as needed, likely every month or so. Air purifiers can attract dust and other types of grime. It is also worth noting that ionic air purifiers release a fair amount of ozone into the air, which can be unhealthy in the long term.

Learn how the Filtrete Fap02 Air Purifier, manufactured by the industry giant 3M with HEPA filter works.

F.A.Q.

Can you wash and reuse air purifier filters?

In some cases, yes. Electrostatic filters are made to be washed and certain HEPA filters can be washed. Read the instructions thoroughly for cleaning directions.


Are washable HEPA filters as effective?

They can be. Washable HEPA filters are not often genuine (otherwise known as true) HEPA filters, as they do not meet certain manufacturing guidelines. That doesn’t mean they are not good. Read about the particular filter and what kind of efficiency rating it has.


What is a HEPA air purifier?

A HEPA air purifier is one that has been equipped with a true HEPA air filter. These filters are great at capturing and trapping a variety of airborne pollutants.



STAT: A purifier with a HEPA (high-efficiency particulate air) filter is designed to remove at least 99.97% of dust, pollen, mold, and bacteria, plus all airborne particles 0.3 microns or larger. (source)

Lawrence Bonk

Lawrence Bonk is a copywriter with a decade of experience in the tech space, with columns appearing in Engadget, Huffington Post and CBS, among others. He has a cat named Cinnamon.

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