Whether you’re shopping for a new computer monitor or a television, at some point you’ve probably run across the term “screen resolution”. And if you’re not a tech buff, this might seem like a foreign term. But knowing what screen resolutions are, why they matter, and which resolutions are best in certain scenarios makes it one of the important tech specifications you need to know. So, if you’ve always wondered how to pick a monitor or television based on resolutions, keep reading to understand more about this key indicator.

What is Monitor Resolution?

In short, monitor resolution refers to the display quality of a screen and is usually listed in width and height dimensions. Specifically, it references how many pixels are within that space.

Breaking down the pixel count

For example, 1080p tends to be an industry standard for Full HD monitors. But the full resolution is usually 1920 by 1080 pixels. This means that the screen is 1,920 pixels wide and has a height of 1,080 pixels. As a general rule, the bigger the resolution, the better the display.

Tip: 1080p tends to be an industry standard for Full HD monitors

Tip: As a general rule, the bigger the resolution, the better the display

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Is 1080p the Only Option?

Not at all. While 1080p is a standard baseline if you’re targeting HD quality, you can find screens with resolutions as low as 720p and some that are significantly bigger at 8K. Although 2K, 4K, and 8K are still mostly limited to premium brands because many computers or visual output devices can’t handle the amount of data needed to properly render content shot in 8K.

Warning: Although 2K, 4K, and 8K are still mostly limited to premium brands because many computers or visual output devices can’t handle the amount of data needed to properly render content shot in 8K

Pixels and Screen Size

Also, note that pixel count will vary based on screen size. 1080p is common in screens that are 21 to 24 inches wide. But you would expect more pixels in a screen larger than 24 inches.

Tip: pixel count will vary based on screen size

Don’t Forget About Refresh Rates

Along with the monitor’s pixel count, you’ll also want to consider refresh rates. Just like it sounds, this term refers to how frequently your monitor updates the display. And just like with general pixel count, the higher the refresh rate, the better the experience. The refresh rate is usually measured in hertz (Hz) and the target metric is going to depend on your usage plans. While general users are fine with a refresh rate of 60 Hz, gamers or designers should opt for monitors that are at least 75 Hz.

Tip: While general users are fine with a refresh rate of 60 Hz, gamers or designers should opt for monitors that are at least 75 Hz

Sources:

https://support.microsoft.com/en-us/windows/change-your-screen-resolution-5effefe3-2eac-e306-0b5d-2073b765876b

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Display_resolution

https://support.microsoft.com/en-us/windows/getting-the-best-display-on-your-monitor-c7e01f63-9b51-2b23-0a0f-6b965af015a9

https://www.msi.com/blog/a-brief-guide-on-current-monitor-resolution

https://support.apple.com/guide/mac-help/change-your-displays-resolution-mchl86d72b76/mac

What is Monitor Resolution FAQ

What is computer monitor resolution?

Screen resolution or computer monitor resolution refers to how clearly content is displayed on the screen. Usually, a higher resolution means that the display will be sharper.

What is a good resolution for a monitor?

This is going to depend on the size of your screen. However, the most common size range is 21 to 24 inches which pair well with 1080p for a quality display.

How do I know if my monitor is 1080p?

If you have a Windows computer you can search for screen resolution from the start button. For Apple computers, that information is available from Apple in the header menu in “About This Mac”.

Dorian Smith-Garcia

Dorian Smith-Garcia is a bridal and beauty expert/influencer and the creative director behind The Anti Bridezilla. She is a diverse writer across beauty, fashion, travel, consumer goods, and tech. She also writes for Inverse, Glowsly, and The Drive along with a variety of other publications. When Dorian's not writing she's collecting stamps in her passport, learning new languages, or spending time with her husband and daughter.

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