If you are thinking about buying a high-rated air purifier to freshen the air of your home, you may have one question on your mind. Can an air purifier remove carbon monoxide? The answer may surprise you.

KEY TAKEAWAYS:

  • Carbon monoxide is an odorless and invisible gas that is responsible for hundreds of deaths each year.
  • Some air purifiers can clear out CO from the air, including purifiers that have been equipped with an activated carbon filter.
  • These air purifiers can be used to handle trace amounts of the gas, but should not be used for large CO leaks.

What is Carbon Monoxide?

Before you understand how an air purifier integrates with carbon monoxide, it can be helpful to know some key bits of information about the gas. Carbon monoxide, otherwise known as CO, has been called the “silent killer” because it is odorless, invisible, and tasteless. Exposure to carbon monoxide can lead to dizziness, headaches, nausea, loss of consciousness, and even death. In other words, you don’t want it in your home or near your family. Other than CO, there are other harmful particles called N95. Having air purifiers that can clean N95 particles is essential in places that are accessed by many people like hospitals or schools.

Insider Tip

Carbon monoxide, otherwise known as CO, has been called the “silent killer” because it is odorless, invisible, and tasteless.

Do Air Purifiers Remove Carbon Monoxide?

Now for the good news. Air purifiers can help remove carbon monoxide from the air in your home, though you should choose one with an activated carbon filter for this task. It should be noted, however, that even air purifiers with activated carbon filters will struggle with large carbon monoxide leaks. You should use these air purifiers to clear out trace amounts of the gas but they should not be used to handle a large gas leak.

If you suspect a carbon monoxide leak, immediately contact a professional or call 911.

Tips to Prevent Carbon Monoxide Leaks

Carbon monoxide is an extremely dangerous gas that can cause serious illness and death. Here are some tips to help you and your family prevent any CO leaks.

Vent Gas Appliances Properly

It is important to properly vent your gas appliances to prevent a carbon monoxide leak. Horizontal vent pipes for appliances, such as those found with a water heater, should lean up slightly as they head outdoors. This prevents CO from leaking if the joints or pipes aren’t fitted tightly.

Insider Tip

Air purifiers can help remove carbon monoxide from the air in your home, though you should choose one with an activated carbon filter for this task.

Check Your Chimney

Chimneys are a common source of carbon monoxide, due to the nature of their designs. Be sure to have your chimney checked for CO every year by a qualified professional. Make it part of the spring cleaning routine.

Install Carbon Monoxide Detectors

Carbon monoxide detectors should be installed throughout your home. Some units offer hybrid designs that cover both smoke and CO detection. Don’t forget to change out the detector’s batteries according to the manufacturer’s instructions.

In addition, you can learn what air purifier will take out some radon. Radon is a dangerous radioactive gas that is the leading cause of lung cancer deaths.

Warning

Exposure to carbon monoxide can lead to dizziness, headaches, nausea, loss of consciousness, and even death.

F.A.Q.

I have a carbon monoxide detector. Do I need an air purifier for carbon monoxide?

A detector will only detect carbon monoxide, and not clear it out. An air purifier could be a good option for the latter, but we still recommend using caution and contacting the authorities if you suspect a leak.


How often should I run my air purifier for carbon monoxide?

Feel free to run your air purifier continuously, so long as it is operating at a low setting.


Will I have to dust after I install a good HEPA air purifier?

Yes, unfortunately. An air purifier will only capture a small percentage of visible dust, as most of it will drop down to surfaces and the floor.



STAT: According to a study conducted by BreatheEasy, between 2018 and 2019, carbon dioxide levels in houses ranged from a safe 750 ppm to hazardous 3900 ppm. (source)

Lawrence Bonk

Lawrence Bonk is a copywriter with a decade of experience in the tech space, with columns appearing in Engadget, Huffington Post and CBS, among others. He has a cat named Cinnamon.

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