Miracle-Machine

Recently, we brought you news of the Miracle Machine, a wine-brewing device for your tabletop. Sadly, we must now report that the device was little more than an elaborate hoax.

Wine To Water

Apparently, the plan was to promote Wine To Water, which is essentially a scheme where you buy wine and some of the money goes to water sanitation. Essentially it was an attempt to market the not-for-profit, and it worked. It helped that the device was more than possible; making your own wine at home is easy to do and the machine would seemingly work. But we’re forced to ask if this really achieved the not-for-profit’s goals.

Hoax Vs. Lie

As the writer of the original article, I admit my ego was pricked by being taken in. No matter how convincing the hoax is, it’s my job to be skeptical. The machine made sense on the surface and it seemed realistic to me, and as such, I apologize for misleading our readers.

On another level, though, reexamining the site forces me to wonder what the point of all this was. Wine To Water essentially drew a lot of attention by promising something it didn’t have. It’s one thing when a hoax is carefully played; the recent hoverboard prank gave just enough subtle indications of being staged that it was fun to pick it apart. There’s no joke here, unless it’s some oenophile thing easy for people to miss. The item itself isn’t ludicrous, or tied to fresh water at all. This was essentially just a bait-and-switch.

Miracles Don’t Come True

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To be honest, this forces me to question the validity of Wine To Water as an enterprise. If they’re willing to perpetrate a “hoax” in order to get some free advertising, it raises some questions about what else they might be dishonest about.

It’s great that sanitation is part of charitable enterprises: The world desperately needs more fresh water. What it doesn’t need is more hoaxes, and hopefully Wine To Water is done with them.










Dan Seitz

 
Dan Seitz is an obsessive nerd living in New England. He lives in the Boston area with a fiancee, a dog, a cat, and far too many objects with processors.