Yes, Chevy’s Corvette C7 is already on sale.  Too bad you’ll have to wait in line as there is more demand than there are Stingrays.  Of course, that is assuming that you want to buy one.  If not, and you just want gape in awe at its supermodel like body and sexy curves, than you need not look any further than this post.  Worry not, as we’ll have a full on review and video walk through of the new Corvette C7 in the very near future.  But for now take a minute and read why the C7 Corvette is such an amazing car for the money.

1. Ride

More often than not, the trade off for sport car handling is a back pain inducing ride.  However, despite my Corvette C7′s stock chassis setup (i.e. no magnetic ride control) it was surprisingly supple yet agile and extremely well planted through the corners.  In fact, so well planted I had to double check the Monroney and make sure there wasn’t something else going on.

2. Good looks (understatement)

Corvette C7

There is no disputing the good looks of the Corvette Stingray C7; it’s a looker. I’ve driven a wide array of cars, including an R8 V10 Plus, and none have elicited more reactions, questions and comments than the C7.  Case in point, just a few days ago, while driving around LA, I received a handful of comments, multiple thumbs up, and witness one lady almost crash her car while trying to yell out her passenger window “beautiful”.

3. Tight but comfortable cabin

Corvette C7-009

I stand at almost 6′ 2″. As a result I had to place the driver’s seat in furthest and lowest position from the steering wheel.  So buyer beware if you’re as tall or taller than me. Yet, despite the tight cabin, the seats in the C7, which offer varying lateral support thanks to the adjustable lumbars, are extremely comfortable as proven during a 4 hour drive to Vegas.  Driving position relative to windscreen height will take some acclimation – it’s fairly low/narrow. – but with the side mirrors correctly setup, and leveraging the power of the back up camera, it’s easy enough to navigate a tight parking lot or a car littered freeway.

4. HUD and Tech

Corvette C7-008

Often the sacrifice in a car of this ilk is the lack of tech amenities.  Not so in the C7.  Touch screen nav, Bose audio system (extra $$), driver adjustable screen (speed, tire pressure, etc) and a HUD make it one of the more well appointed sports car, especially at this price point ($62k).  In the center console is an SD card slot, two USB ports and a cigarette plug.   Sliding down the motorized Nav screen (a toggle switch to the left of it) reveals a small storage area and another USB port.  And let’s not forget the drive select knob that adjusts the car’s steering, accelerator sensitivity and engine note.

5. Rev Matching Goodness

Corvette C7-002

Anyone can down shift in a manual, provided you know how to drive a car with a stick.  But few can actually do it smoothly. The stock C7 includes a user on/off rev matching feature that increases the revs according to the down shift and ensures that the car doesn’t suddenly lunge forward and slow down.  Because I’ve long driven a manual car I found this disconcerting at first, but with acclimation I grew to enjoy it.  It’s just odd that Chevy opted to replace the would be paddle shifters with this feature.  Tap once for off.  Tap again for on.

6. Supercar Fast

Corvette C7-004

The Audi R8 V10 Plus was fast.  And despite the stock C7, which costs a third of that car, it feels faster.  Perhaps it’s the massive 6.2l V8 and the all together audible grunt that it expels as the press of the gas pedal.  Or maybe it’s because it’s a rear engined monster.  From a stop it’s crazy fast. And from speed, and with a quick down shift, it’s maddeningly quick – so much so it can still snap your head back.    Wait, what, I’m doing 120mph?!

7. Amazing Engine Note

Corvette C7-007

Switch to Sport mode and the exhaust note goes from a medium hum to a low rumble.  Press the accelerator pedal while stopped and the C7 cracks with a thunderous clap – it’s was enough to raise the hairs on the back my neck.  While driving through a car garage or around town, this is evidenced by the amount of heads that turn and stare at the car.  Some trying to figure out just what it is, other standing in pure awe.

8. Fully automated Rag Top

Corvette C7-006

I’m no rag top fan – I prefer the lines of a coupe – but boy is this Corvette C7 suited for a rag top.  It also doesn’t hurt that it’s fully automated with no user interaction required beyond pressing and holding a single button.  In my testing, and based on a rough count, it took about 15-seconds for it to completely fold down and stow away.  Air flow the cabin isn’t crazy, especially considering there isn’t one of those silly looking diffusers.

9. Storage

Corvette C7-005

Words like day trip and second car come to mind when I think of the Corvette C7′s storage, or lack there of.  To be fair, and accurate it can fit about 5-6 grocery bags in the trunk, with little to no storage in the cabin, aside from the aforementioned hidden compartment and a very shallow center console.  But your likely not getting this car to drive cross country or run daily errands.  That all said, it’s comfortable enough to be a daily driver, just not practical in a storage sense.

10. Cylinder Deactivation

Around the town and dropping the proverbial hammer will result in perhaps 10 mpg.  Gulp indeed as that’s a tough gas bill to swallow.  But on a highway, at a cruising speed of 60-80 mph it’s capable enough of achieving 25+ mpg.  I averaged 25 mpg during my trips to Las Vegas, and that was with the occasional heavy acceleration.  If driven softly (who would want to I don’t know) it’s reasonable to get 28 mpg (highway), especially when the C7′s cylinder deactivation kicks it into V4 mode.  It’s driver detectable as there is a slight thud, but it’s seamless for the most part.  Just make sure you switch to Eco mode to achieve this.  Don’t worry, passing power won’t be compromised.

11. Price

This is no new story.  The Corvette has long been a bang for buck. But the C7 furthers the gap between this and any other sports car starting in the $50k range.  You just can’t beat it.  You won’t beat it.










Christen Costa

 
Grew up back East, got sick of the cold and headed West. Since I was small I have been pushing buttons - both electronic and human. With an insatiable need for tech I thought "why not start a blog focusing on technology, and use my dislikes and likes to post on gadgets."