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The iPhone 5S has changed how we approach photography. Not only has it introduced slow-motion to millions of pockets, it’s also been on the receiving end of an explosion of creativity with new lenses, add-ons, and ideas. The latest is a night-vision attachment, called the Snooperscope.

Nosy, Nosy, Nosy

Essentially, the Snooperscope is a night-vision monocle for your iPhone, or other tablet/smartphone. It works on the same principle as most night-vision googles; instead of trying to fill the area with visible light, instead it has a set of LEDs on the front that put out light in the infrared range. Not only does this allow you to see in the dark, but it has other advantages as well.

Infrared Blast

Thanks to the properties of the infrared spectrum, you can actually do a surprising amount with the Snooperscope, including look through materials that allow infrared light to penetrate them. For example, you can look through some inks using infrared light, so having a Snooperscope handy means you can finally find out what’s written on that messy document up in the attic.

In a nice touch as well, it’s platform agnostic. Instead of requiring a special case, the scope clicks on with a magnet, making it easy to use with pretty much anything you own. No, it won’t scramble the electronics, they thought of that. That said, it’s limited to iOS and Android; unfortunately you’ll need an app to get the most out of this particular add-on.

It’s Not Easy Being Green

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The Snooperscope, while it does have many scientific applications and uses, is probably going to be used primarily to goof around. Which is great, because really we don’t have enough night vision in our lives. If you’d like to start fluorescing everyone around you and looking through soda, the Snooperscope is currently $70 for an early bird offer on Kickstarter.










Dan Seitz

 
Dan Seitz is an obsessive nerd living in New England. He lives in the Boston area with a fiancee, a dog, a cat, and far too many objects with processors.