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Google Glass is still a hard product to get your hands on, not least because Google is limiting the supply. But increasingly it’s looking like we’re going to get a shot at Glass as a consumer product sooner rather than later, and Google wants to ensure we’ve got the necessary apps.

Taskmaster

The most basic takeaway from Google’s recent reveal of the Glassware Development Kit, which is kinda cutesy even for Google, is that it wants Glass to be a fully functioning tool that does things differently from, say, your phone. The idea is that apps for Glass will be ongoing tasks that will be running even when they’re not on your face, so when you do slap them on, you can immediately get to work. Two apps in particular really show this off, however.

Strava

Cyclists know Strava pretty well; it’s a route tracking tool designed for cyclists and runners. Obviously, there’s a lot of appeal in not having to struggle for your phone to figure out how fast you’re going or what the various fitness data points you’re adding to your graph come out to. And it’s also designed to be unobtrusive; it’s not a constant stream of data, but only available when you glance up.

AllTheCooks

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Another example is a recipe app, AllTheCooks. It’s got step-by-step instructions for each recipe, and it goes back and shows you a step whenever you ask, or whenever you feel like reviewing it. And, of course, you can record making a recipe to add to the system yourself. The idea is that you can see the step while cooking, to ensure that it’s seamless.

Google Glass is still a technology people are a bit skeptical about, so it’s nice to see that it’s being pushed in directions like this. It may not be for everyone, but those who want it will find it a lot more useful.










Dan Seitz

 
Dan Seitz is an obsessive nerd living in New England. He lives in the Boston area with a fiancee, a dog, a cat, and far too many objects with processors.